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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎662] (805/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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662
of his mission to Ibrahim Pasha and ascertainiDg the nature and extent of
the assistance which the ruler of 'Oman himself would be able and willing
to afford, should proceed with the utmost despatch to the camp of the
Egyptian commander, whom he was authorised to assure that ; as soon
after the termination of the monsoon as it might be convenient to under
take operations from India, an adequate British force, naval and military,
would be sent to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for the purpose of co-operating
with the Egyptians in the reduction of Ras-al-Khaimah, and
that the town would thereafter be delivered over to be garrisoned by
Egyptian troops, provided the Pasha should have allotted a com
petent force to the service of covering the siege. In the formal letters
addressed to Ibrahim Pasha that general was congratulated on his recent
biilliant successes, and the scheme of joint Anglo-Egyptian operations
M as unfolded for his consideration. Captain Sadleir was further directed
to study the situation of the Egyptians in Central Arabia and to fathom,
if he could do so without showing too great an interest in the subject,
theii ulterior designs in the direction of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; but, what
ever those designs might be, he was to refrain from giving the Egyptians,
on behalf of the British Government, any guarantee beyond that
authorised in regard to Ras-al-Khaimah. As much information as
possible regarding the geography and resources of Central Arabia itself
was to be collected by Captain Sadleir in his journeyings; and, having
accomplished his mission, he was to return to the Presidency head
quarters.
Befoie Captain Sadleir's arrival on the spot, the political situation had
so changed as to render the main part of his task impossible of fulfilment,
but in his efforts to perform it he showed himself possessed of extra-
ordinaiy energy and perseverance. Incidentally he achieved the
unique distinction of being the first European to traverse the Arabian
continent fiom sea to sea, and that at the hottest season of the year.
Sadleir's Captain Sadleir remained at Masqat from the 7th to the 18th of
uegotiations May 18 L 9 and was successful in obtaining from Saiyid Sa^id a careful
Saltan^f estimate of the political position and military force of the Qawasim, a
18VJ U ' promise by the Saiyid to co-operate in person with the British expedition
at the head of a large force, a precise statement of the part which he
was prepared to take in the operations, and a detailed undertaking
to assist m the matter of supply and marine transport. In one
respect only Sai^id Said was not amenable to persuasion: he would
not consent to any soit of association between his own troops and those
of the Egyptians, and he manifestly regarded the proposed co-operation
■ VM

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎662] (805/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000006> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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