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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎675] (818/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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675
permanent character would be required to confirm the results obtained.
The project to which they inclined was the establishment of a British naval
and military station in a central situation in the Gulf, which would enable
them to exercise a more immediate and commanding 1 influence over its
waters than could be wielded from either Bushehr or Basrah. They
anticipated that the island of Qishm, which with Hanjam they
believed to appertain to the ruler of Masqat, would be found to afford
every advantage for the execution of this scheme; that a port might be
created thereon which, by means of customs dues, could be rendered self-
supporting, at least in part; and even that the Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at
Bushehr, where a commercial factory had ceased to be required, might
without detriment to British interests in Persia be transferred to the new
settlement. The project was referred to Sir W. Grant Keir for an
expression of his opinion ; and in the meanwhile an effort was made,
through the British Envoy at Tehran, to obtain the concurrence of the
Persian Government, which it was felt would probably be withheld.
One battalion of native infantry was the military force which the
Government intended to locate permanently in the Gulf ; but they were
prepared if necessary to exceed this limit, and at one time they even
proposed the retention of one company or more of European troops.
An argument advanced in favour of the occupation of an island was
that a detachment in such a position would be less exposed to attack
than on the mainland, and that the proportion of the garrison immo
bilised for the defence of the station would in consequence be smaller.
At the beginning of April 1820, after a personal visit to Qishm Island,
Sir W. Grant Keir submitted his views. He deprecated the immediate
removal of the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. from Bushehr, as possibly involving the com
mercial ruin of that place ; and he suggested that, after the establish
ment of the new station, some time should be allowed for tiade to settle
in its natural channels before any great modification of the existing
political arrangements was undertaken. Ihe Geneial legal Jed the
position of the garrison at Ras -al-Khaimah as peifectly secnio , but
very serious difficulty existed in regard to the water supply and scuivy
and fever were prevalent, and he consequently advised that^the troop
should be transferred to Qishm, which he concurred with the G-oveinme
of Bombay in thinking the most suitable place in the neighbouih )o
cantonment.
These views having found acceptance. Captain Thompson, >
'having exerted himself most successfully iu acquiring the ^
^ the inhabitants/^ had been placed in political and militai} ^
Recommenda'
tions of Sir
W. Grant
Keir.
Evacuation of
Ras -al-Khai
mah, 18th
J uly 1820.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎675] (818/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000013> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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