Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎676] (819/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

Temporay
occupation
of Qishm,
followed by
a system
of purely
maritime
control.
670
Ras-al-Khaimah with the 1st Battalion of the 2n(l Native Infantry and
2U artillerymen under his orders, was instructed, after procuring the
consent of the Saiyid of iMasqat, to remove his force to the island of
Qishm, destroying the defences of Ras-al-Khaimah before evacuating it
and handing the town over at his departure to Shaikh Sultan-bin-
Saqar of Sharjah, or to any other suitable chief. Saiyid Sa'id having
readily signified, in writing, his consent to the occupation of Qishm,
Captain Thompson proceeded to negotiate with Sultan-bin-Saqar,
promising him possession of Ras-al-Khaimah on condition that he should
agree to the detailed stipulations of which the omission from the General
1 reaty of Peace had been regretted by the Bombay Government ; but to
this condition the Shaikh would by no means agree, and he further
insisted that the defences of the place should not be destroyed before its
rendition. Captain Thompson, as the Shaikh remained obstinate and
he himself was not vested with discretion in the matter, first destroyed
neaily every building in llas-al-Khaimah, these being all in a greater
or less degree fortifications, and then evacuated the place on the 18th of
July. Two days later the troops disembarked at Qishm town.
The occupation of Qishm having given rise to difficulties with
Peisia, and the climate of the island having proved extremely unhealthy,
a scheme of maritime control was, about the end of 1821, adopted by
the Government of Bombay on the advice of Mr. Meriton, Superinten
dent of Maiine ; this, it was hoped, would render superfluous the reten
tion of a military force in the C-Julf. It was decided to maintain in all a
squadion of six cruisers, of which three, based on the island of Qais, should
cruise continually off the Arab ports from Rams to Dibai. On the
island of Qais, which was selected because the prevailing winds favoured
rapid communication between it and the Pirate Coast, a small depot of
stores, with gunboats, should be established under the care of a Master
Attendant and the protection of a small sepoy guard. Of the remaining
three cruisers, two were to be employed in carrying despatches, in affording
convoy, and in other miscellaneous duties between Masqat and Basrah ;
and the third was to be used in maintaining communication with
Bombay. A year later, on the evacuation of Qishm being carried
into effect, these arrangements were slightly modified, four instead of
three vessels being appropriated to active cruising duties, while one only
was reserved for general employment between Masqat and Basrah
Masqat was made, at the end of 1822, the point of rendezvous of the
H.E.I. Company's vessels in these seas; but in 1823 Mughu on the
Persian Coast was substituted, and arrangements were made for establish-
ing a store depot at that place, as also a Native Agent Non-British agents affiliated with the British Government. on the part of the
Resident m the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Ultimately in September 1828 the
J 5'
Vi

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎676] (819/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000014> [accessed 19 October 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000014">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;676] (819/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000014">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0819.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image