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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎690] (833/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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ascendancy
of the Shaikh
of Sbftrjah,
1823-32.
nent subordination of 'Ajman was not admitted, and the Shaikh was
further informed that the British Government took no interest in his
claims to suzerainty over other chiefs.
Lieutenant McLeod, dissenting from the current view that the
ruling Shaikh of Sharjah was little better than a monster in human
shape, described him at this time as a turbulent and ambitious man. but
superior in ability, as well as in most other respects, to his neighbours.
The establishment of Shaikh Sultan's power over the whole Pirate Coast
might, he reported, possibly be advantageous to Government; but it
should be understood that, as no Shaikh was absolute even in his own
tribe, so the hegemony of Sharjah over the other principalities would be
nominal at the best; and the Resident foresaw trouble from the
rancorous hatred of its ruler for Saiyid Sa'id of Masqat.
The principality of Dibai, sill governed by Zaid-bin-Saif, the uncle
of the Shaikh, was at this time dependent on that of Abu Dhabi, of
which the ruler was Tahnun bin-Shakhbut; and both of these states,
which were military and pastoral rather than maritime in their condition,
generally inclined to alliance w th Masqat.
The Qawasim, whose extrene poverty and fewness of resources were
now for the first time set in a clear light, still built their boats entirely
of Indian teak; their warlike stores were obtained from Bahrain, from
the Persian ports of the lower Gulf, and from Masqat; and their arms,
mostly taken from prizes, were commonly of Persian manufacture.
None of the chiefs possessed more than three or four boats except
Sultan-bin-Saqar who hac 7 at least 30 fine vessels, each capable of
containing 50 to 100 men; and it was strongly suspected that most of
these were over three years M and had been hidden away by the Shaikh,
instead of being surrendered, at the time of the British expedition.
Qadhib-bin-Ahmad of Jazirat-al-Hamra was now dead; in 182-i his
successor was removed by Sultan-bin-Saqar to make way for a more
pliant representative in the person of one Ahmad-bin-'Abdullah; and
about the same time the Shaikh of ''Ajman also bow T ed to the inevitable
and acknowledged the overlordship of Sharjah. In 1825 Shaikh Sultan,
having acquired influence at Dibai by his own marriage with the sister
of the young Shaikh, was scheming to obtain actual possession of that
place, the nearness of which to his capital would be a serious danger in
case of its falling under inimical influences. In 1832. however, Sultan-
bin Saqar, made aware by experience of the disadvantages of being
e responsible for the behaviour of minor chiefs, formally resigned his
pretensions to suzerainty over ^Ajman and Umm-al-Qaiwain; and in
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it set

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎690] (833/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000022> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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