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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎698] (841/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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098
solution of this difficulty, finally attained in 1 879, the time was not yet
npe.
Cases of The principal infractions of the Treaty of Peace of 1820 and of
breaches'of ^ ie Maritime Truce at the time in force may now be placed on
the Mnrii'iue record ; but in doing so it is unnecessary to distinguish between the
1835-53, two classes, for all aggressions at sea were now equally included in the
piratical category. The much less serious character, on the whole, of
the olfences committed during this period is a clear testimony to the
progress made, under the Treaty of Peace alone, in the years preceding.
1^37, In 1837 an ordinary piracy was committed on a boat belonging to
bandar 'Abbas by inhabitants of llairah village; but the Shaikh of
Sharjah, whose subjects the pirates were, of his own accord compelled ^
them to make restitutiori. iaoivaL
[838, In 1838 two Qasimi subjects, Sultan-bin-Sohar and Muhammad-hin-
Sohar, brothers, attacked and plundered a Kharag boat at the northern
end of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , killing several persons ; and they also looted, - 1 rei
in the vicinity of Ras-al-Hadd, a vessel belonging to the Batinah coast.
Sultan, having been captured at Lingeh, was delivered over by the - K 1 '
British Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. to the Shaikh of the Ka'ab, whose » let
interest in the case will be explained further on; but Muhammad and a . :?nvltli1
Nakhuda The (usually Arab) captain or master of a local boat. who had been associated with him in his misdeeds, on their
surrender by Shaikh Sultan-bin-Saqar after severe treatment at Sharjak -1
were released by the British authorities with a light additional punish- ttred
ment. Also in 1838, a Baqarah belonging to Khaburah in the ^Oman Dj ia
Sultanate was stealthily pursued by a Baqarah of Dibai to an anchorage itim;
at Barkab and there, at night but not unawares, attacked. Of nine mew
on board the Khaburah vessel, six were wounded and two subsequently ,; em ;■
died ; but blood-mcney and other compensation were exacted in full from
the aggressors by the British authorities through the Shaikh of Dibai. .^ ( , t j ieri
1840 In 1840 some petty controversies took place on the pearl banks, and lesia
elsewhere at sea, between subjects of Abu Dhabi and Dibai and between i?
subjects of Sharjah and Abu Dhabi ; but they were unaccompanied by :.t ■ ^
bloodshed or extreme violence and were adjusted by the Hesident under ntl the
the terms of the Maritime Truce. More serious was the plunder by Bin- iatejvafi
Askar, a member of the rebellious Qubaisat section of the Bani ^ as, in ^
iiis llight with a number of companions from Abu Dhabi to Dibai, of two
Baqarahs owned by Bani Yas and containing pearls of high value; nor did a ,,.
the Shaikh of Dibai at once comply with the demand of the British l!lf[ ^
authorities, that Bin-'Askar should be handed over to his own Shaikh. ,1,^
The ruler of Bibai also became liable about this time for compensa-
lion on account of an Abu Dhabi boat, which some of his subjects, mov- ^ 0
1 ^

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎698] (841/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x00002a> [accessed 25 February 2018]

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