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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎720] (863/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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720
On his first visit to the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. after the conclusion of the
Perpetual Peace, the Resident, Captain Kern ball, found the Shaikhs
eontirmed in their " attachment and devotion to the British Govern
ment " and in their resolution faithfully to observe their engagements.
On this occasion only two slight cases of breach of the peace at sea
came under his consideration, and they were easily settled.
In January 1855 a Shu^ai belonging to one 'Abdul Karim of
Bahrain, having been driven by a storm to take shelter near Khor-al-
'Odaid, was attacked and plundered there by two Baghlahs of Abu
Dhabi; in the fray 'Abdul Karim himself was wounded and one of his
men was killed. The Shaikh of Abu Dhabi, Zaid-bin-Khalifah, who
had just succeeded to the Shaikhdom, at first demurred to settling the
case on the ground that it had occurred under his predecessor; but, this
piea having been disallowed, he complied with the demands made on him
through Commodore Ethersey by paying full compensation for the
robbery and §600 as Diyah or blood-money on account of the murdered
man, and by causing the two offending Baghlahs to be burnt.
A disturbance which took place at Hamriyah in 1855 gave rise to
several slight aggressions at sea, two of them upon stranger vessels
belonging to the Batinah coast; but redress in these cases was
easily obtained.
In November 1855, while the " Kallian'"', a Bombay native vessel
belonging to a Hindu British subject, was unloading her cargo at
Sharjah, a storm arose and drove her on shore. On the wind
abating a rabble from the town came down to the beach and plundered
and partially destroyed her, besides tearing down a British flag wbich
the Nakhuda The (usually Arab) captain or master of a local boat. had hoisted for her protection j and a second British flag
having been hoisted, the Arabs began to abuse the British Government
and violently assaulted one of the crew. A man-of-war was accordingly
despatched to Sharjah with a demand for compensation, for the repair
of the vessel, and for the punishment of the guilty parties ; and, after
a vain attempt by the Shaikh to present the case as one of wreck and
to throw the blame upon Bedouins not amenable to his authority,
these terms were substantially fulfilled.
An ordinary ease of the seizure of runaway divers upon the pearl banks
was so energetically handled in this year by the Shaikh of Abu Dhabi,
who imprisoned the chief offender and returned the kidnapped divers
to the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. Agent at Sharjah, that Government authorised a
special increase in the value of his next annual present.
A peculiar case arose in July 1856 from the participation of a force,
sent by sea from Sbarjah, in an attempt to reinstate at Abu Dhabi

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎720] (863/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000040> [accessed 21 May 2018]

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