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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎723] (866/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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723
belonging to the port in tow. In the result the compensation, amounting
to $810, was disgorged within 48 hours, and subsequently an additional
punitive fine of ?500 was levied under the orders o£ the Bombay Govern-
ment.
In 1866 the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , Colonel Lewis Pelly, submitted for the 1866-68,
information of Government a number of specimen cases illustrative of the
petty irregularities which still frequently occurred in the Gulf. It appears
that Colonel Pelly felt himself precluded under recent orders from resort
ing to coercive measures, or even to the imposition of fines, without the
previous sanction of Government; and that the abolition of the Indian
Navy, whose ships, always at the disposal of the Resident, had been
replaced by those of the Royal Navy with more extensive duties to per
form. had increased the difficulties of the Resident's position. The
reply to this important reference, in which the Resident clearly implied
that more freedom oi action should be allowed him and a greater material
force placed at his disposal, is unfortunately not traceable.
From this time onwards the maintenance of the peace in Gulf waters
seems to have become almost a matter of routine, and recourse to excep
tional measures was seldom required. In September 1868, however, in con
fection with a great raid by the Shaikhs of Bahrain and 'Abu Dhabi upon
the coast of Qatar, described in the history of Bahrain, Colonel Pelly
found it necessary under the orders of Government to proceed to Abu Dhabi
with the a Vigilant a Sind " and " Hngh Rose'", and a satisfactory
settlement was obtained, but not without actual preparations for a bombard
ment. The terms enforced included the surrender of a Mashuwah and
two Arab mares and the payment, partly by instalments, of compensa
tion to the amount of $25,000 ; but of this large sum, it would appear,
only Rs. 3,740 was ever actually realised. The Shaikh was obliged by
Colonel Pelly to give up his only three guns, which were however returned
to him, as their removal might have exposed the town of Abu Dhabi to
Bedouin attacks.
Considerable alarm was caused in Trucial 'Oman by the Turkish 1871.
expedition which annexed Ilasa in 1871, for the avowed object of the
Turks was the subjugation of " Najd/' and it appeared that by " Najd "
they understood all countries which had at any time paid tribute to the
Wahhabi Amirs; the statement even appeared in an official journal at
Baghdad that Sharjah, Dibai and Abu Dhabi were places in " Najd."
The British Government, however, were ultimately successful, as related
in the histories of Hasa and Bahrain, in inducing the Turks to confine
their proceedings to Hasa and Qatar; and meanwhile, in June 1871,
they instructed the Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. to prevent the Trucial
55 a

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎723] (866/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000043> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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