Skip to item: of 166
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Agency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1883-84.’ [‎51r] (41/166)

The record is made up of 1 volume (87 folios). It was created in 1884. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

EESIDENCY AND MUSCAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. FOR 1883-84.
39
APPENDIX B TO PART III.
SUPPLEMENTABY NOTES ON CAKE AND CULTUEE OP DATE TREES AND PEUIT.
[Videpage 43 of Administration 'Report for 1877-781]
In districts wliere date plantations are large and on extensive scales, tlie cultivators do
not tliiak seriously of the comparatively small loss, caused by the depredations of wasps,
sparrows, crows, " bulbuls/"' &c., on the sweet date fruit while forming on the palm, and as
a rule do not provide against sugar-loving insects and birds, and grudge them not a share of
the fruit. They say that in the good old times the cultivators were more liberal-minded,
when the export trade of the date to European countries and America did not exist, and those
countries had not acquired a taste for this fruit; that then any number of strangers could go
to a plantation and treat themselves acl libitum to any quantity of date fruit they liked,
without objection. But times have changed. The demand for the fruit having largely
increased, it is more taken care of, and strangers are not allowed to indulge in those liberties.
But I believe that all this apparent indifference to the encroachments of the aforesaid
creatures cannot be solely attributed to their alleged magnanimity and charitable feelings for
them—at least in these days whan the fruit has a market value; but that their indolence and
the actual difficulty, perhaps costliness, of the measures to provide against these inroads must
explain a great deal. The ordinary wants of these people are few and simple; they are
satisfied with what little they get, and are content to live on the same; as a result their
inventive faculties are not taxed for devising means against such sources of loss, which
certainly cannot be considered of no moment. But if the case was otherwise, and the struggle
for life was as great as in European countries, protective measures would doubtless be fast
forthcoming, simply because " necessity is the mother of invention/-' In places where the
date palms are few, and some choice dates are concerned, the date bunch is put into a gunny
bag and the mouth of the bag closed up and tied securely at the lower part of the date spadix,
to prevent the depredations of those insects and birds. At Bustak, Gowda, Jenna, and other
inland districts on the Persian mainland, where dry hot winds prevail, the cultivators allow
the fruit to ripen and dry on the palm, and with a view to protect it from the injurious effects
of very dry and hot winds as soon as the date has become sweet, but before it has commenced
to soften and become juicy, they wrap up the whole bunch, the stalk of which being already
sufficiently bent down for purposes of easy manipulation, in the leafy twigs of a perennial
bush called " salm, ^ and, securely tying the leafy covering, leave the bunch until jit is finally
cut down when the date has ripened and formed. This method gives also a good deal of
protection against the inroads of birds and wasps.
In some districts, as those of Minab, sometimes bears prove destructive to the fruit; but
the cultivator effectually provides against their climbing up by tying a quantity of some
thorny bush or twigs of samr (thorny acacia) or koona (zyzyphus) around the stem of the
palm at some height from the ground.
Against a flight of locusts he is perfectly helpless; all his attempts at driving them away,
by beating about among the palms with dry date leaves, and agitating them to cause a rustling
noise, &c., and his burning quantities of hay, tamarisk branches, and other rubbish to create
smoke, prove of little or no avail; as, when the locusts alight and squat, they completely
devour the fruit and leave the palm, in a short space of time, divested of its leafy appendages.
There are two principal forms in which the date fruit is cured and prepared for commercial
purposes,— viz., (1), "khoorma," soft and juicy; (2) "kharak-pookhta," dry and firm.
The following is the usual mode adopted for preparing "khoorma" for commercial
purposes : —
As soon as the dates become ripe and juicy, they are picked off the tree and gathered into
a round chunam tank called "madibsah," where they are exposed to the sun and air, and
throw off the excess of juice which runs through the aperture at the bottom of the
" madibsah," and collects in a separate jar, buried underground to receive it. After two or
three days' exposure, when the date has sufficiently hardened and formed, it is removed and
packed in date-leaf baskets for exportation. Sometimes, when the owner does not find a ready
purchaser, he stores the date baskets in a close-plastered room called "kandool" in piles of 15
to 20 baskets; the floor is furnished with channels which convey the juice thrown off under
the mutual pressure of the bags, to a large jar buried underground. Sometimes the juice is

About this item

Content

Administration Report on the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for the year 1883-84, by Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , published by Authority by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Ross to Charles Grant, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 17 July 1884, is included in the report (folio 33), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Report ), written by Ross (folios 34-39), containing summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: Oman and the Pirate Coast; Bahrain; Nejd, El-Hasa [Al-Hasa] and El-Katr [Qatar]; Fars, including Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh] and Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], and the coast between Bushire and Bandar-e Lengeh; Persian Arabistan; Persian Beloochistan [Baluchistan] and Gwadur; and Bassidore. The report also contains summaries of changes in official personnel (referred to as political establishment); British naval movements in the Gulf; and a summary of meteorological events observed at the Bushire observatory. Appendix A contains tabulated and graphical meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Administration Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for the year 1883-84 ), submitted by Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Barrett Miles, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat, dated 9 June 1884 (folios 40-50), containing a summary of affairs at Muscat, including raids and fighting around Muscat in October 1884, between rebel forces and those allied to the Sultan of Muscat. The report also records changes to British official personnel at Muscat, and notes recent shipwrecks on the Muscat coast. Appendix A is a biographical sketch, written by Miles, of Sayyid Sa'eed-bin-Sultan, the Imam of Muscat.

Part 3 ( Report on Trade for the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for 1883 , folios 50-105), comprising a short summary of the year’s trade, and followed by two appendices, labelled A and B, but arranged in reverse order: B) Supplementary notes on the care and culture of date trees and fruit, written by A. R. Hakim, Assistant to the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. ; A) tabulated data on trade, including data on imports and exports into and out of the Gulf ports of Bushire, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab (Oman) coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folios 53-54.

Part 4 (

[at Muscat]), submitted by Miles, dated 9 June 1884 (folios 105-12), comprising a short summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and an appendix containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (87 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data after each. Two appendices following part two of the report are labelled in reverse order (B then A, instead of A then B).

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 32, and ends on the last folio, on number 112.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Agency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1883-84.’ [‎51r] (41/166), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/45, No 198, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023580328.0x00002b> [accessed 21 April 2024]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023580328.0x00002b">‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Agency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1883-84.’ [&lrm;51r] (41/166)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023580328.0x00002b">
	<img src="https://iiif.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000358.0x00023f/IOR_V_23_45_ No 198_0042.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000358.0x00023f/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image