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'Articles in Press on Gulf Affairs' [‎55r] (111/728)

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The record is made up of 1 file (362 folios). It was created in 17 Nov 1938-10 Oct 1939. It was written in English, Arabic and French. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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9.
trucks, and steam rollers, sweated and groaned. In 105 days
the first cargo of crude oil gushed through a pipe line into
the ship at the mooring three miles offshore.
Everybody took a good rest except the claim adjuster, who
found his hands full quieting with rupees Indian silver coin also widely used in the Persian Gulf. infuriated fishermen
who said the oil dripping into the water had made all the fish
run out to sea. To keep the natives' good will was important.
They cabled San Francisco for gadgets, and in two months the
pipe line was fixed so that not a drop of oil went into the sea*
Construction has never ended. Only last spring were
housing plans completed, with air conditioning in the last of
the 71 houses and "bachelor apartments. Now it is discovered
seat
that the 250/movie theater is too small, and a new one is
"being started. There are tennis courts, a golf course, cricket
and soccer fields, free outboard motorboats and sailboats.
The services of doctor and dentist are free. Food and
lodging are furnished to the "Europeans 5 ', as all who are not
natives are called in that part of the country, American
tobacco and English liquor are cheaper than in the United
States. A long leave is granted every three years, a short
one in the summer.
Realizing that this oil field, which it wouldn't sell for
0100,000,000, was dropped into its lap, the oil company has
spared no expense to keep everybody happy, the British, the
employees, the natives. It would be a paradise except for the
isolation and the heat.
At first, in exchange for complete co-operation, the
company promised the British that fas soon as men could be
trained, 90 per cent of the European employees would be
British. Thus the government can, in part, save its face and
eventually, perhaps, give the impression that Bahrein is a
British/

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Content

The file contains transcripts and reports of press articles on Bahrain and the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , and associated correspondence. Much of the press is critical of the Government of Bahrain and the British administration there. The sources for the press articles are mainly the Arabic and French language press of Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Bahrain itself, but there are also articles from German, United States, and Indian publications. The Arabic and French articles are mostly provided by L'Orient Arabe press agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. of Cairo, Egypt. The associated correspondence is mostly from Hugh Weightman, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain, Lieutenant-Colonel Trenchard Craven William Fowle, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , and Charles Dalrymple Belgrave, Adviser to the Government of Bahrain. There is also correspondence from other British officials in the Middle East, the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , the Foreign Office, and officials of the Bahrain Petroleum Company (BAPCO).

The file includes papers relating to articles in the Al Bahrain newspaper of Bahrain, March -May 1939, and September 1939, including letters from Belgrave and British officials expressing criticism of the paper and the need to impose censorship.

The Arabic and French language content of the file consists of letterheads and reports of L'Orient Arabe.

The starting date of the overall date range is provided by the covering letter for the translation of an article that was published on 2 November 1938, and the end date of the overall date range is provided by an entry in the notes at the end of the file.

Extent and format
1 file (362 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in chronological order from the front to the rear of the file. Circled serial numbers written in pencil and red crayon or ink can be found throughout, but do not refer to the existing notes at the rear of the file.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at 1 on the front cover and terminates at 363 on the back cover. The numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and can be found in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. Foliation anomaly: ff. 1, 1A. A second, incomplete foliation sequence numbered 340-364 appears between ff. 338-362. The numbers are written in pencil, but are not enclosed in a circle, and appear in the same position as the main sequence.

Written in
English, Arabic and French in Latin and Arabic script
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'Articles in Press on Gulf Affairs' [‎55r] (111/728), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/178, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023625573.0x000070> [accessed 14 July 2024]

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