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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎54r] (16/60)

The record is made up of 1 volume (29 folios). It was created in 1889. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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b.esidenct and MUSCAT POLITICAL agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. FOE 1888-89.
15
APPENDIX A TO PART I.
NOTES ON THE "IBN RASHEED" FAMILY OF JEBEL SHAMMER, AND PRESENT POSITION
OF MOHAMMED "IBN RASHEED."
The works of Mr. Palgrave and o£ Mr. and Lady Anne Blunt have rendered the names of
Jehel Shammer and its capital, Hayil, familiar to many readers of travel, and in the past year a
more elaborate book was published by Mr. C. Doughty, containing a very full description of
Central Arabia, and much valuable information. Indeed, Mr. Doughty's book must take rank
as the standard English work on Arabia of modern times.
Mr. Palgrave visited Hayil about 15 years ago, when Telal^ eldest brother of the present
Chief, was Emir. Mr. Doughty travelled in Arabia from 1876 to 1878, and the Blunts in 1879,
Since the latter date the power of tc Ibn .Rasheed >} has been extended, and is now paramount
in Nejd.
The word " Nejd," as is well known, means " high " or " table-land," and according to
Arabian geographers the region so named comprised all Central Arabia from Hejaz to 'Irak.
Whilst the power of the Wahhabi Emirs lasted, El-Hasa was, in a political sense, a portion of
Nejd, and now that a Turkish Governor resides in El-Hasa that Turkish administration is
called by the Turks the " Government of Nejd." At one period, it may be, Nejd was held to
mean the provinces ruled by the Wahhabi; but, however that may be, the name should now be
regarded as a geographical expression, including in its scope Jebel Shammer and all the prov
inces of Central Arabia lying within the tracts of red-sand deserts [ Dahna or Nefood].
The Shammer tribe which is connected with the Kahtan has risen to importance in Nejd
within the last half century. Some sixty years back the family of the Shaikhs of the Sham
mer was divided into rival branches, the Al-'Ali and the A'l-Uasheed. A contest for supre-
premacy, as usual, occurred, which ended in the extermination of 'AVAli, and Abdallah-Ibn
'Ali-lbn Rasheed became Shaikh of the Shammer, with Hayil for his residence, circa 1835
A.D.
It is said that Abdallah succeeded through the aid of the Wahhabi Emir, Feysal Ibn
Toorkee, He had also a staunch and able supporter in his brother ^Obeyd.
'Abdallah Ibn Rasheed, as he was commonly called, a man of rare ability^ inaugurated the
policy which, followed by his successors, has led to the establishment of the supremacy of the
Shammer Chief over a large portion of Central Arabia. By the Wahhabi Emir,'Abdallah
was nominated " Muhafidh," or " Warden of the Marches," and thus was in the position of a
Frontier Governor under the Wahhabi, Jebel Shammer at that epoch being a province of the
Wahhabi Empire. Until his death 'Abdallah-Ibn Rasheed remained a vassal of the Wahhabi
Emir.
In the year 1846 Abdallah Ibn Rasheed died, and was succeeded by his eldest son Tilal,
whose name became so well-known through the eulogies of Palgrave. Tilal became wholly
independent of the Wahhabi Chiefs of Riadh, and governed with consummate skill and caution
until A.D. 1867, when, tortured by some internal malady, perhaps fearing loss of reason, he
committed suicide by shooting himself.
Tilal was succeeded by his brother Muta 'Ab-Ibn 'Abdallah, who lacked the prudence and
skill of Tilal, and behaved harshly to his nephews, the sons of the latter. Two of these
nephews. Bandar and Bedr, conspired against Muta' Ab and succeeded in putting him to death
in the year 1868 A.D.
Bandar-Ibn-Tilal then assumed the reins of Government at Hayil.
At that time Mohammed Ibn Abdallah, younger brother of Tilal, and now Emir, was
residing at Riadh as a fugitive, and was kindly treated by the Wahhabi Emir Abdallah-Ibn
Feysal, who effected a sort of reconciliation between Mohammed and his nephew Bandar.
Mohammed became the leader of pilgrims, and it was when entering Hayil in that capacity
that he suddenly stabbed his nephew Bandar to death. This event, which occurred in^ 1868,
was immediately followed up by the slaughter of all the remaining children of Tilal, and
Mohammed Ibn Abdallah, or, as he is now generally called, " Ibn Rasheed," became Emir and
Muhafidh in Hayil. A full account of the circumstances attending the accession of the present
Emir is given by Mr. Doughty in his work " Travels in Arabia Deserta.

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Administration Report on the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. (no 265, Foreign Department serial no 25) for the year 1888-89, published by Authority and printed by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul-General for Fars, to Henry Mortimer Durand, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 21 June 1889, is included in the report (folio 48), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Summary ), submitted by Ross and dated 21 June 1889 (folios 49-57), containing numbered summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: 1) Oman and Muscat state; 2) Oman pirate coast, including Ras-el-Khaimah [Ra’s al-Khaymah], Umm-el-Kawain [Umm al-Qaywayn], ’Ajman, Shargah, Debaye [Dubai], and Abu-Dhabbi [Abu Dhabi]; 3) El-Bahrain; 4) El-Katr [Qatar]; 5) Nejd and El-Hasa [Al-Hasa]; 6) Fars and the Persian Coast; 7) Persian Arabistan; and 8) Persian Baluchistan. Summaries of official appointments, naval movements, slave trade activity and climatic observations taken at the observatory at Bushire conclude the report. Appendix A is entitled ‘Notes on the “Ibn Rasheed” family of Jebel Shammer, and present position of Mohammed “Ibn Rasheed”’, with a genealogical table of the Rasheed dynasty. Appendix B is a translation of the Shah of Persia’s proclamation of 1888. Appendix C is a copy of the regulations for the navigation of the river Karun. Appendix D contains tabulated meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Annual Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. and Consulate for the Year 1888-89 ), submitted by Lieutenant Wallace Stratton, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat, containing a summary of affairs at Muscat (folios 58-59), under the headings: political affairs, official changes, and slave trade.

Part 3 ( Report on the Trade of South Persia and Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1888 ), submitted by Ross (folios 60-69). The report comprises a short summary of the year’s trade, with notes on: produce, including grain, opium, tobacco, gum and wool; steamers and freights; imports, including cotton goods, copper, loaf sugar, and petroleum; banking agencies; the opening of the river Karun to navigation; and the pearl fisheries. Appendix A comprises tabulated data on import, exports and revenue, in the Gulf ports and towns of Bushire, Shiraz, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folio 61v.

Part 4 ( Muscat trade report for the year 1888-89 ), submitted by Stratton and dated 17 May 1889 (folios 70-75), comprising a brief summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and also containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (29 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data following each part. The General Summary is further organised into numbered sections, and further divided into paragraphs which are also numbered, from 1 to 102.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 48, and ends on the last folio, on number 75.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎54r] (16/60), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/56, No 259, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626733.0x000011> [accessed 24 April 2024]

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