Skip to item: of 60
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎58v] (25/60)

The record is made up of 1 volume (29 folios). It was created in 1889. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

ADMINISTRATION REPORT OP THE PERSIAN GULF Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. POLITICAL
sal received letters from the most important Chiefs in 'Oman, containing pro-
fessions of friendship and good-will towards him, and the news of his accession
seems to have been favourably received throughout the Province.
A week after Seyyid Turki's death. Colonel Ross, Resident in the Persian
Gulf, arrived in the Lawrence and paid a visit of condolence to the three sons
of the late Sultan, which they returned the following day. Colonel Ross left
Muscat the same evening.
About the end of June Seyyid Sa'eed, the ex-Minister, having heard of
Seyyid Turki's death, returned from Kishm. This action was strongly dis
approved of by Seyyid Peysal who deputed his brother, Seyyid Pahad, to meet
Seyyid Sa'eed on landing, with instructions that the latter was to consider
himself under restraint during his stay in Muscat. Seyyid Sa'eed thus virtu
ally became a prisoner in his own house. He was shortly afterwards compelled
to leave the place, and started for Bunder Abbas on 1st July.
During the month of June there were some slight intertribal disturbances
in the district, but these were not dependent on the events taking place at
Muscat.
In July, four Banians arrived from Burkah with a complaint that they had
been assaulted by a party of Beni Jabir whilst drawing water at Burkah. The
case was represented to His Highness the Sultan, and an enquiry resulted in
the imprisonment at Muscat of the ringleaders of the offending party.
A proposal was made by His Highness to collect " Zekat" (taxes) from
purchasers, on produce arriving from the interior at coast-towns. This, being
contrary to treaty, was disallowed.
Pighting again occurred at Burkah between the Yal Bede and Hikman
tribes, in which six men on each side were killed. A fight also took place in
the Wadis, Ghafir and Shatan between the Ghafree tribes, Meyayihah and
Ibriyeen, in which some 50 men were killed and an equal number taken pri
soners. Peace was restored by the mediation of Sayyid Ibrahim-bin-Keis, of
Rostak.
_ -'• n August His Highness Seyyid Abdul Aziz wrote to the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ,
stating that he felt himself called upon and impelled to reform the Province of
Oman by force of arms, and enquiring whether the British Government would
assist him in his plan of reformation and conquest. He added that, if he could
rely on the support of the British Government, he could, no doubt, mature his
schemes <{ easily and without bloodshed." This letter was referred to the
Resident at Bushire, and under his orders Seyyid Abdul Aziz was to be inform
ed that he had already been made acquainted with the views of Government,
and that no other amplification thereof seemed necessary.
Letters were received from the Wali and towsnfolk of Awabee, the former
stating that the latter were in league with an agent of Seyyid Ibrahim-bin-
Keis, named Ibrahim-bin-Sa'eed, to deliver up the place to him. The Wali
s a e a e a frustrated this design by his watchfulness and had destroyed
t ic watercourses of the townspeople by way of punishment. The people, on
f 6 T i. an ' C0m P^ Ile ^ tbey had been unjustly punished, and that the
® h ® d been . mTe pted hy the Wali out of spite towards Ibrahim-bin-Sa'eed,
who had been imprisoned.
pnnnfrTfnf ft- ! )r ^ ers Nakhl to proceed to Awabee to
• vi t n 0 16 a ai1 ' ail( i directed that the people should be allowed to re
pair their watercourses.
Rpni^TT^ ^ f occurred at Khasab between the Kumzar and the
Bede bin * a T i P - i 5 eySal de P ute(i ^is brother Seyyid Pahad, Seyyid
Bede-bin-Seif and Sheikh Shamis-bin-Hasan to settle the quarrel. The de-

About this item

Content

Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. (no 265, Foreign Department serial no 25) for the year 1888-89, published by Authority and printed by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul-General for Fars, to Henry Mortimer Durand, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 21 June 1889, is included in the report (folio 48), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Summary ), submitted by Ross and dated 21 June 1889 (folios 49-57), containing numbered summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: 1) Oman and Muscat state; 2) Oman pirate coast, including Ras-el-Khaimah [Ra’s al-Khaymah], Umm-el-Kawain [Umm al-Qaywayn], ’Ajman, Shargah, Debaye [Dubai], and Abu-Dhabbi [Abu Dhabi]; 3) El-Bahrain; 4) El-Katr [Qatar]; 5) Nejd and El-Hasa [Al-Hasa]; 6) Fars and the Persian Coast; 7) Persian Arabistan; and 8) Persian Baluchistan. Summaries of official appointments, naval movements, slave trade activity and climatic observations taken at the observatory at Bushire conclude the report. Appendix A is entitled ‘Notes on the “Ibn Rasheed” family of Jebel Shammer, and present position of Mohammed “Ibn Rasheed”’, with a genealogical table of the Rasheed dynasty. Appendix B is a translation of the Shah of Persia’s proclamation of 1888. Appendix C is a copy of the regulations for the navigation of the river Karun. Appendix D contains tabulated meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Annual Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. and Consulate for the Year 1888-89 ), submitted by Lieutenant Wallace Stratton, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat, containing a summary of affairs at Muscat (folios 58-59), under the headings: political affairs, official changes, and slave trade.

Part 3 ( Report on the Trade of South Persia and Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for the Year 1888 ), submitted by Ross (folios 60-69). The report comprises a short summary of the year’s trade, with notes on: produce, including grain, opium, tobacco, gum and wool; steamers and freights; imports, including cotton goods, copper, loaf sugar, and petroleum; banking agencies; the opening of the river Karun to navigation; and the pearl fisheries. Appendix A comprises tabulated data on import, exports and revenue, in the Gulf ports and towns of Bushire, Shiraz, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folio 61v.

Part 4 ( Muscat trade report for the year 1888-89 ), submitted by Stratton and dated 17 May 1889 (folios 70-75), comprising a brief summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and also containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (29 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data following each part. The General Summary is further organised into numbered sections, and further divided into paragraphs which are also numbered, from 1 to 102.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 48, and ends on the last folio, on number 75.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎58v] (25/60), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/56, No 259, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626733.0x00001a> [accessed 23 January 2020]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023626733.0x00001a">‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [&lrm;58v] (25/60)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023626733.0x00001a">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000358.0x00027c/IOR_V_23_56_ No 259_0025.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000358.0x00027c/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image