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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎59r] (26/60)

The record is made up of 1 volume (29 folios). It was created in 1889. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and muscat political agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOE 1S88-89.
25
putation proceeded to Ras-el-Kheimah in the 23rd August and
returned to Muskat on 29th idem, bringing as prisoners four Sheikhs of the
Knmzarand three of the Bern Huieeyah, who, on arrival, were confined in Tort
Jellali.
Meanwhile news had been received that Seyyid Ibrahim-bin-Keis was on
the point of starting to seize Awabee. Seyyid Feysal wrote to the Ibriyeen to
defend Awabee, and to the Wali of Nakhl to give any assistance in his power.
The Ibriyeen, however, had been gained over by Ibrahim-bin-Keis, and re
mained aloof from the struggle. Awahee feU on 2nd September after a stout
resistance, in which the son of the Akeed Ali-hin-Seif El-Ibree was killed.
On hearing of this, Seyyid Peysal determined on an expedition against
Rostak, the stronghold of Seyyid Ibrahim, and wrote to the tribes to assemble
at Burkah. War materiel was despatched in the Bar as salami under Seyyid
Hamad-bin-Nasir and an escort of Arabs to reinforce the garrison at Burkah.
Seyyid Ibrahim had written by this time to explain his seizure of Awabee.
He stated that the inhabitants had asked him to expel the Governor for his
oppression towards them, and, as he considered Awabee to be one of his own
forts, he had acceded. It seems that Awahee had originally been held in his
interests by the Ibriyeen, who had afterwards delivered it oyer to the late
Sultan.
On 18th September, accordingly, His Highness started for Burkah in
his steamer the Sultanee, accompanied by his brother Seyyid Muhammad,
Sheikh Tahnoon-bin-Za'eed-bin-Khalifah of Abu-Dhabbi and all the principal
al -bu-Sa'eedees of Muscat, except Seyyids Hilal and Muhammad-bin-Azzan,
The expedition, however, proved a failure. Almost from the first there was
defection in Seyyid Eeysal's army, the Chiefs with him preferring to try and
arrange a peace between him and Seyyid Ibrahim to fighting. Want of money
to pay the troops further operated to this end. It appears that, on landing at
Burkah, His .Highness proceeded to Washeyl near Rostak, where the people
of the surrounding country tendered their submission to him. A fight took
place between the two forces which resulted in Seyyid Feysal establishing him
self in the Mizarse bastion, after which he proceeded to shell the fort of Rostak.
The Yal Saad tribe had in the meantime risen, and were attacking Scyyid Peysal's
line of communications with the sea. This led to a request that Her Majesty's
Ship Turquoise might be sent to the Batinah Coast to make a counter-demon
stration, which, however, was not acceded to.
The Sultan's army now became completely disaffected, refusing to fight any
longer, and Seyyid Eeysal was compelled to make peace. His Highness returned
to Muskat on 17th October, after a fruitless absence of a month, and Awabee
remained in the hands of Seyyid Ibrahim, to whom also hopes appear to have
been held out for the renewal of the subsidy enjoyed by him during Seyyid
Turki's life-time. In December, the Yal Saad, who rose against Seyyid Feysal
during the Rostak expedition, sent messengers to Muskat to ask pardon for
their action. His Highness accepted the apology and pardoned the tribe.
A letter was received by His Highness the Sultan from Sheikh Saleh-bin-
Ali and Joomah-bin-Saeed, in which it was proposed that Seyyid Abdul Aziz
should be sent to the East Coast of Africa, there to assist the local tribes in
repelling the advances of the Germans in that quarter. Such a course, if
successful, they said, would result in honour and fame to the Sultan, and even,
if not successful, the absence of Abdul Aziz from 'Oman would be ensured.
The writer suggested that, if necessary, the British Government should be
consulted on the point. Seyyid Feysal replied in very short and decisive terms
that he did not care to entertain the proposal for a moment, and that Seyyid
E

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Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. (no 265, Foreign Department serial no 25) for the year 1888-89, published by Authority and printed by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul-General for Fars, to Henry Mortimer Durand, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 21 June 1889, is included in the report (folio 48), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Summary ), submitted by Ross and dated 21 June 1889 (folios 49-57), containing numbered summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: 1) Oman and Muscat state; 2) Oman pirate coast, including Ras-el-Khaimah [Ra’s al-Khaymah], Umm-el-Kawain [Umm al-Qaywayn], ’Ajman, Shargah, Debaye [Dubai], and Abu-Dhabbi [Abu Dhabi]; 3) El-Bahrain; 4) El-Katr [Qatar]; 5) Nejd and El-Hasa [Al-Hasa]; 6) Fars and the Persian Coast; 7) Persian Arabistan; and 8) Persian Baluchistan. Summaries of official appointments, naval movements, slave trade activity and climatic observations taken at the observatory at Bushire conclude the report. Appendix A is entitled ‘Notes on the “Ibn Rasheed” family of Jebel Shammer, and present position of Mohammed “Ibn Rasheed”’, with a genealogical table of the Rasheed dynasty. Appendix B is a translation of the Shah of Persia’s proclamation of 1888. Appendix C is a copy of the regulations for the navigation of the river Karun. Appendix D contains tabulated meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Annual Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. and Consulate for the Year 1888-89 ), submitted by Lieutenant Wallace Stratton, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat, containing a summary of affairs at Muscat (folios 58-59), under the headings: political affairs, official changes, and slave trade.

Part 3 ( Report on the Trade of South Persia and Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for the Year 1888 ), submitted by Ross (folios 60-69). The report comprises a short summary of the year’s trade, with notes on: produce, including grain, opium, tobacco, gum and wool; steamers and freights; imports, including cotton goods, copper, loaf sugar, and petroleum; banking agencies; the opening of the river Karun to navigation; and the pearl fisheries. Appendix A comprises tabulated data on import, exports and revenue, in the Gulf ports and towns of Bushire, Shiraz, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folio 61v.

Part 4 ( Muscat trade report for the year 1888-89 ), submitted by Stratton and dated 17 May 1889 (folios 70-75), comprising a brief summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and also containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (29 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data following each part. The General Summary is further organised into numbered sections, and further divided into paragraphs which are also numbered, from 1 to 102.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 48, and ends on the last folio, on number 75.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎59r] (26/60), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/56, No 259, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626733.0x00001b> [accessed 22 January 2020]

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