Skip to item: of 150
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1899/1900’ [‎279r] (31/150)

The record is made up of 1 volume (60 folios). It was created in 1900. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

i
RESIDENCY An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. AND MASKAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. P OR THE YEAR IS 99 . 18 oo.
23
This epidemic, like its two predecesso^waT^ITTTT^T ---
Epidemic theMekra^''l' 0 haTe ^SinaTed"^
there with great severity for nearly two month, Tt t ? m ay and to have ra ged
the month of August, when great apprehensions It t ' lencc , 1 " tr ^™ed into Gwadurin
ing to Maskat, the local authorities were rLeateX . fe| t "f the disease extend-
keepiug it out. But the local anthorities failed to . I ^ringent measures for
fore, no wonder that in the absence of even the oJ?; UP • 6 daI W au d it was, there-
broke out in the neighbouring sea-port town of Mnt™?rT" 11 ™ 8 ; 38 antiei P a t<«i ) the disease
no precise date or mode of inrportation can be Led unon i m0U f th f Although
disease had been in existence for some davs m-f may y 1)6 c0 "< ,lu Jed that the
came casually to my notice. ' J perhaps, some weeks before its presence
In a place like Maskat, where therp i'o *
tion regarding- the health of the population tLTrt f. nan - e ™ ent for obtaining informa-
and history of an epidemic disease as mav ba J 'i lffi . cu } ties in tlie way of tracing the origin
is added the persistent hostile attitude of the e ,? n ' ]eetlI1 ' edj . are & rea ^ but when to them
subject, the task becomes a hopeless one The fS of J 6 ' 111 t0 any 0,1
the Jabru suburb of Matrah, which is m^stlv inS? 1 1! t?** . havin g broken out in
imported by some Baluchi passengers from C wJ bv Mckranis, points to its having been
small sailing craft arrived from either of the nlaop^ fi"" 0r an . a,:,0ut that time no
gers arrived here by one of the mail steamers This ^ 18 thafc th ose passen-
ably supported by the fact that all quarantine'arr^m aSftUfn P tl0n would appear to be consider-
the 15th July to the 16th August so that thpiinQ * ' me,lts . vv . ei " e suspended in Maskat from
not undergo even the formaTb^ Period did
circumstances. The fact also that the epidemic (Wl W H ^ ^ ould llave done lmd er other
the original focus of infection withoutTxcit^^^^ insidiously even in
support to it. In fact even after the existenpp nf ,• ,. s P 1cl0n 01 flawing attention to it lends
attacks were so few at first that I am of opinion that 8 the 6 tTsf a well ' reco p lse(i thio ^ the
prior to any suspicion of its presence. ' Case cIlolera occurred long
Barring- the fact that the hot and dry winds which usually prevail during the months of
Meteorological and other conditions preceding June and Jul y wer e protracted and nnusallv severe
tbeo,,tbreak - t, 1 '" 6 nothing abnormal in the condition of
t * • ,, ... the atmosphere.
During the period immediately preceding the epidemic, namely, the month of Auo-ust and
early part of September, the weather, as usual at that time of the ykr, was damp in fonse-
quence o a s long south-west monsoon wind, charged with moisture, and although people here
condition 6 of fhe eX , peneilCe f the ^emic of 1865, to have an impression"that a humid
condition of the atraospliere such as exists during the prevalence of the south-west
monsoon favours the spreading of the disease, there was no peculiar atmospheric condilion
during the lecent epidemic, to favour or retard its progress. Nor was there any abnor
mal circumstance noticeable in connexion with the soil of the place.
^ ^ 0WeVe ^ a /i )t0ri 5 U i S fact thatthe sanitar ^ con( lition of Maskat and Matrah had
atwTpd'lf ^ k and J hea P s ot ' rubblsh and putrefying organic matters not unfrequentlv
attracted attention both mside the towns and in the suburbs. But this was by no
unusual circumstance for the place as it had been in existence for years, nor do I
UGll©! uiltlu tlltn DV ifiSfilf" fllnTIP P!3."n r»Vir*l • e4-ill 4 ^ ^ J —1 j ! j ii
means an
hold the
-7 \n i 1 exisience ror years, nor do 1 hold the
k n ^ . "7 a ^ one can cause cholera ; still there is no denying that these dunc-
mlls and insanitary centres had a powerful influence as a predisposing cause on its propaga
tion; wliat share they took in it may be judged by the fact that the greatest incidence "of
attacks occurred in localities quite close to them. What I wrote in 1876 in myMedical
topography of Maskat has in this respect come to be true
. ' Maskat has undoubtedly been entirely free from the disease (cholera) since then (1865) ;
but the sanitation being so very defective, some of the predisposing causes are always in exist
ence, and the introduction of the specific poison will excite an epidemic of great virulence and
severity."
The first case that made me suspect the probability of the appearance of cholera in Matrah
The first cases that came to my notice. Was that of a Sunnee Persian boy named Abdur
.... Kahman bin Muhammad, about 12 years of age,
living in the Mazi Meya quarter of the town, who was reported to me as having died suddenly
on the 19th of September. An inquiry into the cause of his death elicited the fact of his having
suffered from vomiting and purging two days previously and of his having been in bad health
since then j he was found to be unconscious and to have passed a large watery motion just
before his death. This was followed in a few days by the news of the death of a Shia Persian
girl, named Mannee, about 13 years of age, living in Jabru, one of the suburbs of Matrah, on
the 28rd, from choleraic symptoms, and on inquiry it was ascertained that her young brother,
about nine years of age, living in the same house, had suffered from similar symptoms two
days previously and had recovered. Some more cases then came to my notice as having
occurred within the next few days in the suburb of Jabru. The disease would thus appear to
have originated in Jabru to whicti it was at first principally confined, particularly as there seems
no difficulty in tracing connexion between the first case, namely, that of the boy Abdur
Jaahman, and that suburb, provided the possibility of his having visited that locality or of bis
having drunk water from a probably infected source of supply there be kept in view. Besides

About this item

Content

Administration Report on the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muskat [Muscat] Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for 1899-1900, published by the Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India (Calcutta), forming part of the Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Foreign Department, and based on reports sent to Government by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat.

The report is divided up into a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part 1, is a General Summary (folios 268-71) written by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , Lieutenant-Colonel Malcolm John Meade:

  • Section 1: entitled General , includes: a report on the year’s rainfall and harvest; the Governorship of Bushire; public peace and tranquillity in and around Bushire; public health and measures to restrict cholera and the plague in the Gulf; Persian currency; customs house arrangements in Bushire; compensation claims; and the Resident’s tours through the region during the year;
  • 2: Oman – Muscat: including: a change in personnel, with the role of Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. being taken over by Captain Percy Zachariah Cox from Major Christopher George Forbes Fagan; the Sultan of Muscat’s finances; French proposals to construct a coal depot in Muscat; use of the French flag by Muscat vessels; association of the French flag with the arms and slave trades; the impact of cholera and plague in the region;
  • 3. Oman – Pirate coast, including: a list of the those shaikhs in the region who have met with the Resident in the past year; Arab-Persian relations over Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], and the expulsion of Persians from that port; the discovery of a large pearl at Kumzār and its subsequent sale for a lower-than-expected price; the prevalence of smallpox on the Arab coast;
  • 4. Bahrain, including: the wounding of two British-Indian subjects; difficulties discharging cargoes in Bahrain; and the death of Aga Muhummad Rahim, the Native News Agent in Bahrain;
  • 5. El-Nejd, with no report due to the recommendation that no one be deputed to travel there;
  • 6. Koweit [Kuwait]: no particulars reported;
  • 7. Persian Arabistan: the navigation of the Kārūn river, and opening up of river and land routes for trade;
  • 8. Fars and Persian coast: Bandar-e Lengeh in Persian hands; the arrival of the British Vice-Consul for Bunder Abbas [Bandar-e ʻAbbās];
  • 9. Persian Baluchistan: delays in compensation claims against the murder of Mowladad Khan; a change in the Directorship of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Telegraphs Department; rumours of a revolt against the Shah in Persian Baluchistan;
  • 10. Slave Trade: numbers of slave captured and manumitted during the year;
  • 11. Piracy: cases of piracy reported during the year, with details of where and against whom they were committed;
  • 12. Navy: details of the movements of British naval vessels (Sphinx, Lapwing and Pigeon) and significant foreign vessels, including Russian warship Gilyak;
  • 13. Official Changes: changes in British personnel;
  • 14. Changes among foreign representatives, with particular reference to German, French and Dutch representatives.

An appendix to part 1 (folios 272-75) includes statistical tables comprising meteorological data for the region; dispensaries in Bushire and data for the numbers of patients, diseases, surgical operations and income and expenditure of the Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. dispensary.

Part 2 (folios 276-78) is a separate report from the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , written by Cox, with reports on events in Muscat, Rostak [Rustāq], Sohar, Soor [Sur], and Dhofar [Z̧ufār], including: accidental shootings by Wahabee [ Wahhābī A follower of the Islamic reform movement known as Wahhabism; also used to refer to the people and territories ruled by the Al-Saud family. ] tribesmen; the appearance in Muscat of cholera and the plague; British and foreign naval movements in Muscat; and a statistical overview of manumission applications heard at the agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. .

Appendix A to Part 2 (folios 278v-85) is a detailed report with statistical data on the cholera epidemic in Muscat and Oman, written by the Lieutenant-Colonel Atmaram Sadashiv Jayakar, Chief Surgeon at Muscat. Jayakar’s report contains historical data on outbreaks of cholera in Muscat, symptoms of the disease, mortality statistics, treatment and its results, preventative and sanitation measures. Civil hospital and dispensary statistics follow on folios 285v-287v.

Part 3 (folios 288) is a trade report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for 1899, written by Meade. Its appendices (folios 289-328) comprise tables showing the value of all goods imported and exported to and from various parts of the Gulf region, and the numbers of vessels (with figures on tonnage) of various nationalities plying their trade in the region in each port.

Part 4 (folios 329-30) is a separate trade report with statistical data for Muscat for 1899-1900.

Part 5 (folios 331-35) is a trade report for Mohammerah [Khorramshahr] and the Kārūn river for the year 1899.

Extent and format
1 volume (60 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into a number of sections and subsections, with statistic data in tabular format directly following written sections. There is a contents page at the front of the report (f. 267) which lists the report’s contents in alphabetically ascending order, and refers to the report’s own pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1899/1900’ [‎279r] (31/150), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/77, No 379, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626792.0x000021> [accessed 14 April 2024]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023626792.0x000021">‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1899/1900’ [&lrm;279r] (31/150)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023626792.0x000021">
	<img src="https://iiif.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000358.0x0002f4/IOR_V_23_77_ No 379_0032.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000358.0x0002f4/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image