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'Military Report on South-West Persia, Including the Provinces of Khuzistan (Arabistan), Luristan, and Part of Fars' [‎35] (62/466)

The record is made up of 1 volume (390 pages). It was created in 1885. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: Printed Collections.

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PART 11.
Detailed Account of South-West Persia.
^ PERSIAN GULF Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
rpHE Northern Coast of tlie Gulf, as the Persian side may be termed, pre-
_L sents in its whole extent, from the delta of the Euphrates to the Mekran
coast, a series of rugged, precipitous mountain ranges, one behind the other,
running nearly parallel to the coast, and to each other.
The mountain ranges increase in height as they recede from the sea, and
General character—In- no kind of vegetation can be seen on their bare and
habitants and harbours. deeply furrowed sides. Being visible at great distances,
they form excellent landmarks.
The small seaport towns are almost exclusively inhabited by Arabs, who
originally came from the opposite coast, and formed settlements there, owing
to intestine commotions in their own country, or to a spirit of enterprise.
At the larger places an admixture of Persians is found; but the Persian is
not a maritime nation, all the boats sailing from Persian ports being manned
by Arabs.
The coast is generally uninviting and barren, except near the villages,
where date groves are generally found, with a small amount of cultivation.
There are no rivers, as we understand the word; and water is. generally
only found in wells or reservoirs of rain water. There are no good harbours
for large ships, though there are plenty of roadsteads or anchorages sheltered
against one or other of the prevailing winds, though not against all.
Winch. —The navigation of the gulf in a sailing ship requires great
attention. The winds, as in most inland seas, are very uncertain, and blow
occasionally with great force down the gulf; and in winter also in the opposite
direction. They set in without much warning.
The prevailing wind in the gulf is undoubtedly the north-wester, called
by the natives sJiamdl.\ This wind blows down the gulf, changing its
direction with the trend of the coast.
During a shamdl, if after rain, the air may be clear and sky cloudless,
but at times the air is so loaded with dust from the Mesopotamian deserts
that a dense mist is the result.
During the winter months, south-easters, called by the natives shurgi or
Jcoss, alternate with the north-westers; and, like the $hamdls, follow to a
certain extent the direction of the coast; they only blow strong from Decem
ber to April.
The koss is generally accompanied by thick gloomy weather with hard
squalls, and often much rain; sometimes thunder and lightning. The atmos
phere is moist, and the barometer generally low.
Squalls, —At the change of the seasons in autumn, very severe squalls
may be expected, called by the Arabs leheymah ; it does not appear that the
direction of these squalls is fixed.
* Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Filot,
t The Arabs say there are 40 days of this wind, as also 40 days' extreme heat, and 40
days' extreme cold. Forty has always been a favourite indefinite number with the Eastern8.

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Military Report on South-West Persia, Including the Provinces of Khuzistan (Arabistan), Luristan, and Part of Fars by Major and Bt. Lieut-Col. Mark S. Bell, V.C., R.E.

Publication Details: Simla: Government Central Branch Press, 1885. Prepared in the Intelligence Branch of the Quarter Master General's Department in India.

Physical Description: 3 maps in end pockets. 41 plates.

Extent and format
1 volume (390 pages)
Arrangement

This volume contains a table of contents giving chapter headings and page references.

Physical characteristics

Dimensions: 245mm x 150mm

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Military Report on South-West Persia, Including the Provinces of Khuzistan (Arabistan), Luristan, and Part of Fars' [‎35] (62/466), British Library: Printed Collections, V 8685, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023694939.0x00003f> [accessed 20 September 2019]

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