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'Persian Gulf - Turkish jurisdiction along the Arabian coast (Part III)' [‎8v] (10/30)

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The record is made up of 1 file (15 folios). It was created in 2 Dec 1881. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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10
To the question, thus stated, the Law Officers*
(2nd December 1879) replied with a simple negative,
without giving reasons.
With reference to it, the Foreign Office wrote to
us on the 22nd December 1879 :—t
" The question is no doubt one of degree, de
pending upon the magnitude and continuance of
the evil, and the extent to which it is tolerated or
neglected by the Turkish Government and officials;
but, for the present, Lord Salisbury would be very
unwilling that any action should l)e taken as to the
legitimacy of which such grave doubt must be
held to exist. Moreover, though Lord Salisbury
does not deny the importance of putting a speedy
check to these disturbances of the peaceful com
merce of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , there are, in His Lord
ship's opinion, other and larger considerations of
Imperial policy which render it inexpedient to
adopt a course in the matter which might be re
garded by the Porte as unfriendly and aggressive,
or might be pointed out by other Powers as showing
ait intention of subverting or weakening the Sultans
authority in a portion of his Asiatic dominions."
For these reasons Lord Salisbury thought it
decidedly preferable, in the first instance, to en
deavour to come to some arrangement, explicit or
tacit, with the Porte, by which the inconvenience
resulting from the undefined nature of Turkish
authority on the El Hassa coast, and from the
remissness and inefficiency of the Ottoman officials
in keeping the police of their waters, might as far
as possible be obviated.
With this expression of Lord Salisbury's views,
the drafts of two Despatches on the subject to Sir
H. Layard were referred for Lord C ran brook's con
currence.
The first draft forwarded the correspondence and
papers bearing on the matter, drew attention to the
material documents, noticed the action which had
already been taken at Constantinople, and the
absence of any mult from it in the shape either
of punishment of offenders or compensation to the
sutterers, and then went on :
" 'L It ,i s cle , ar ' hat a state of thiugs should
of the-^rkTsh C COntmue ' eithCT ' m >he interests
other countries interested' I, tlle' ^mLe'L 1 of the
the surrounding waters am? Uw? commerco
ment are con4^Lt tKM,
co-operate in anv nlm , e readily
adapted to preyeut surf. 7 " a - V seem we U
irritating claims and questionsTo "'f
fail to give rise." wnich it cannot
"7. They would propose for this purpose that
1
• Sir J. llolker.
Sir H. Giffard.
Mr. J. P. Doaite.
f Horn®, No. 984.
411

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Content

A printed memorandum written and compiled by Adolphus Warburton Moore for the Political and Secret Department of the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , and dated 2 December 1881.

The document is a continuation of ' Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. - Turkish jurisdiction along the Arabian coast (Part II)' (IOR/L/PS/18/B19/2) and broadly addresses the same issues, namely, how to respond toTurkish claims to sovereignty along the southern coast of the Gulf that could potentially impinge on Britain's commitments with local rulers (in Bahrain and the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. ) and their security responsibilities at sea (the suppression of piracy).

The document summarises correspondence from the previous two years (1879-1881) that had dealt with the matter, beginning with an outline of the opinions of officials from the main departments and institutions involved: the Foreign Office, the Government of India, and the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. (whose opinion Warburton represents). Other correspondents include officials from the Residencies and Agencies in both the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and Turkish Arabia, as well as the Ambassador at Constantinople.

The documents cover several topics, including:

  • The threat to Bahrain from the Beni Hajir tribe and Ottoman ambitions to extend their sovereignty to the island, including the Turkish plan to build a coal depot on the island as a pretext to further political involvement;
  • Questions of how to police the waters under Turkish authority;
  • How Britain should deal with Shaikh Jasim [Jāsim bin Muḥammad Āl Thāni] of El Bidaa [Doha];
  • Turkish claims to parts of the coast of Guttur [Qatar].

The document concludes with the perceived outcomes of the discussions, including closer ties with the ruler of Bahrain, who, in December 1880, agreed not to open relations with any foreign power other than Britain.

The author quotes extensively from the correspondence and other sources, notes on which are to be found in the margin throughout.

Extent and format
1 file (15 folios)
Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation for this description commences at folio 4 and terminates at folio 18, as it is part of a larger physical volume; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. An additional foliation sequence is also present in parallel between folios 4-197; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled, and can be found in the bottom right corner of each folio.

Pagination: the document also has an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Persian Gulf - Turkish jurisdiction along the Arabian coast (Part III)' [‎8v] (10/30), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/18/B19/3, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023807397.0x00000b> [accessed 16 December 2019]

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