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'File 13/2 VII Air facilities in Arab shaikhdoms' [‎143r] (285/430)

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The record is made up of 1 file (212 folios). It was created in 20 Sep 1945-25 Aug 1946. It was written in English, Arabic and French. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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©1.
i.ith t he canpliments of the Director-Gcner^l
of Civil Aviation.
R.13848/46.
23th June, 1946.
Dear Cheetham,
B.O.A.G. have informed us that when the "G" Class flying boats
are yathdravm at the end of this year they will no longer need the
staging posts at Sharjah/Dubai which are at present used for land
p anus and 1lying boats respectively. They enquire whether the S.A.F.
have a continuing interest in Sharjah and if so whether thoy would
be prepared to maintain signals and other facilities there. So far as
B.C..i.e. themselves are concerned they would only want to keep one
moonng for emergency use.
, . Pr j rna facie if B.O.A.C. no longer need to call at Sharjah and
iJuoaL there is no reason why they should continue to provide facilities
there unless in view of the present political situation in Persia it is
considered desirable that we should retain any footholds wo already
have on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . ^
The present arrangements at Sharjah and Dubai are covered bv
agrecmentswith the Sheikhs. The original agreements terminated in
1943 when they were renewed for a further period of five years. They
!u tW0 Tnore .^ ars t0 ^ before expiring. The agreements
provide- .or the provision and operation by Imperial Airways (now B.O.A.O.'
tx aerodrome facilities for their own purposes at specified financial
terms and for landings by R.A.P. aircraft free of cost.
• thG havo in fact a continuing interest
+ wh ^ ch the y contemplate retaining as a staging post on the
regular 1 flight 8 t0 ^ that th;i ' S Wil1 n0t naccssaril y involve
Apart from the political considerations India is also interested
because she will sooner or later be operating airlines to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
rem Karachi to Basrah and may need the use of these stations. We are
sending a copy of this letter to Prance at the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. and perhaps
i enough to let us havo the views of the Government of
India on this aspect.
If there are no strong objections on political grounds to B.O.A.C -s
evacaation of Sharjah the R.A.P. would have to make their own arrangements
s' atu^^ 1 " 8 0f ^ Stati0n and thiS Chan ^ from civil military^
status would presumably require the negotiation of a new agreement or
t any rate a very clear understanding with the Sheikh of Sharjah.
bc ^ discuss this possibility with the Air ; inistry we shall
. grateful for an expression of the Foreign Office and India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors.
views from the political angle. It should, however, bc borne in mind
" m " !. QVen ^ 0 t :Lt boin S taught desirable that the station
should continue to bo maintained by B.O.A.C. there would be verv real
practical difficulties in doing so in view of its isolated position
if no service regularly operated there.
as woU^, 3 *'^ 8 COpi " ° f this ;Lottor t0 Vfarra n at the Air Mnistry
as well as to Prance of the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. .
lours sincerely.
N.J.A.Choetham, Esq.,
Foreign Office,
Downing Street,

About this item

Content

The file contains correspondence related to the negotiation of new or continuing civil air agreements between British Government representatives and the Sheikhs of Bahrain, Qatar and the Trucial States. The main correspondents in the file are the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. in Bahrain (Major Arnold Crawshaw Galloway until July 1946, thereafter Hugh Rance), and the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Sir Geoffrey Prior until November 1945, Sir Rupert Hay thereafter).

The file begins with correspondence related to negotiations for the continuance of the Civil Air Agreement already in place between the British Government/British Overseas Air Corporation (BOAC) and the Government of Bahrain (see 'File 13/1 I Aerodrome at Bahrain' IOR/R/15/2/505 for the original agreement). Notes from a meeting that took place at the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. in London on 9 October 1945, outline the British Government's reasons for wishing to extend the Agreement by seven years (folio 9).

Subsequent correspondence in the file relates to a number of new air routes proposed between Europe and India/Asia, which would entail increasing numbers of international aircraft passing over or refuelling on the Arab Gulf coast. These airlines included Transcontinental and Western Airlines (TWA), Air France, Morton Air Services Limited, and Dalmia Jain Airways. The Chicago Convention, an international code intended to coordinate and regulate international air travel, had been signed on 7 December 1944. Amongst its provisions was the need to accord equal rights to all aircraft flying over foreign territories. In response to the convention, the British Government had to seek the Arab coast sheikhs' agreement to conform to the Chicago code, in order to permit airlines such as TWA and Air France the right to fly over or land in the dominions. Copies of the letters sent by Galloway to the various sheikhs are included in the file (folios 41-48), along with the sheikhs' replies (folios 61-66, 70-71, 73-80). The file also includes a printed copy of an agreement between the British and French Governments relating to air transport between British and French territories, issued on 28 February 1946 (folios 129-140), and reports of TWA's plans to fly to Bombay via Saudi Arabia (folio 184).

Extent and format
1 file (212 folios)
Arrangement

The contents of the file have been arranged in approximate chronological order, running from the earliest items at the front of the file to the latest at the end.

There is a set of office notes at the end of the file (folios 199-213) which mirrors the chronological arrangement. The office notes comprise a numbered list of items contained in the volume. Each item is written in red or blue/black ink, dependent on whether it refers to an incoming (red) or outgoing (blue/black) piece of correspondence. The list references items in the file, marked either with corresponding red or blue numbers.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The main foliation system starts on the front cover of the file, and runs to the inside back cover. It uses circled pencil numbers in the top-right corner of each recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. . There is a second foliation system which uses uncircled numbers, also in the top-right corner of each folio. This foliation system runs through most of the volume, merging occasionally with the main foliation system. Some items in the file are marked with circled red or blue crayon numbers, which constitute part of the original filing arrangement. Blue numbers are used for outgoing correspondence, red numbers for incoming correspondence.

Folio 66 is a fold-out.

Written in
English, Arabic and French in Latin and Arabic script
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'File 13/2 VII Air facilities in Arab shaikhdoms' [‎143r] (285/430), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/507, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023848279.0x000056> [accessed 10 December 2019]

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