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'Confidential 86/7-IV B.40. Petroleum Concessions Limited - Trucial Coast.' [‎156r] (316/522)

The record is made up of 1 volume (257 folios). It was created in 17 Jun 1936-9 Nov 1936. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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This point, however, brings up the whole question of
our legal pov/ers on the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. which are of course
nil, since we have no Order in Council A regulation issued by the sovereign of Great Britain on the advice of the Privy Council (in modern practice, upon the advice of government ministers). there. We may
have to have an Order in Council A regulation issued by the sovereign of Great Britain on the advice of the Privy Council (in modern practice, upon the advice of government ministers). for Debai (as well as
±or the other States of the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. where oil is
found) as we have had to have one for Qatar, but I think
the change in the wording of this article which I suggest
would be a useful step in getting the Sheikh to recognise
one at least of the powers which we shall have to get by
Order in Council A regulation issued by the sovereign of Great Britain on the advice of the Privy Council (in modern practice, upon the advice of government ministers). . I suppose, however, that from the
legal point of view even though the Sheikh agrees no
one can legally be deported until an Order in Council A regulation issued by the sovereign of Great Britain on the advice of the Privy Council (in modern practice, upon the advice of government ministers).
containing that proviso has actually been published. i?
In addition to the amendments suggested by Colonel Fowle,
it is agreed that the last sentence of the article should
be omitted.
Article 35 .- Some provision should be made that the bank
must be a British one, provided that a British tank is
prepared to open a branch. This might well be inserted
in the exchange of Notes with the Sheikh, and it is
unnecessary to make any alteration of the commercial
agreement.
A fresh article should be inserted on the lines
suggested in Mr. Longrigg’s lette.r^to Mr. Walton dated 14th
Ma y• A copy of this was enclosed in the express letter to
the Government of India dated 20th May, P. Z. 3J365/36. The
article reserves the decision in regard to frontier disputes
between Trucial Sheikhdoms to the Resident. /
•8.3k
■If. o

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Content

The volume contains a record of negotiations between Major Frank Holmes and Ashraf Halim [Ashraf Halīm] on behalf of Petroleum Concessions Limited, and the Shaikh Sa'id bin Maktum [Saʻīd bin Maktūm Āl Maktūm], Shaikh of Dibai [Dubai], over a concession agreement for Dibai, which resulted in a concession being agreed and the clauses of the concession being initialled by each party with the Shaikh of Dubai intending to sign the concession formally once it had been approved by the British Government, draft copies of the concession are included at folios 70-73 and 91-109.

Also included in the volume are correspondence and meetings between Petroleum Concessions Limited (Stephen Hemlsey Longrigg), the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. (John Walton, Maurice Clauson), the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Trenchard Craven Fowle, Percy Gordon Loch), the Petroleum Department (Harold Gordon Gunn), the Admiralty (Ebenezer Seal) and the Foreign Office (Terence Vincent Brenan) to discuss both the amended clauses of the concession agreement for Dubai and the necessary Political Agreement between Petroleum Concessions Limited and Her Majesty’s Government. The main points of discussion being the clauses in the Political Agreement relating to protection of Company Employees, jurisdiction for expelling foreigners from Dibai, and the need for a British controlled Refinery in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .

Also under discussion is the question of boundaries between the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. Shaikhdom’s and how best to settle them in relation to concession agreements; and reports of communications between the Shaikh Sa'id bin Maktum, Ruler of Dubai and Shaikh Shakhbut bin Sultan [Shaikh Shakhbūt bin Sulṭān bin Zāyid Āl Nahyān], Ruler of Abu Dhabi with the intention of settling themselves the boundary between their respective territories which the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. believes to be the best solution to the boundary question, provided they are able to reach a consensus.

Correspondence between the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the Secretary of State for India, the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. Bahrain and Petroleum Concessions Limited discussing the protection undertaking required by the British Government before the options secured by the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. Shaikh’s could be approved. The correspondence confirms the acceptance by the Shaikh’s of Abu Dhabi and Dibai of the condition; the refusal of the Shaikhs of Sharjah (Sulṭān bin Saqr Āl Qasimī) and Ras al Khaimah [Ra's al Khaymah] (Shaikh Sulṭān bin Sālim Āl Qasimī) to agree to the condition as it contained references to compensation without any upper limit or detail of amounts; and the non-response of the Shaikh of Ajman (Rāshid bin Ḥumaid Al-Nu`aimī) to the agreement. The correspondence continues by discussing ways of convincing the Shaikh’s of Sharjah and Ras al Khaimah to agree to the undertaking and possible reassurances that could be given in relation to the question of compensation.

Other topics discussed include:

Draft concession agreements and correspondence with Shaikh's in Arabic and English.

A series of file notes which were maintained as a record of the correspondence in the volume can be found at folios 248-255.

Extent and format
1 volume (257 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a table of contents on folio 5 consisting of subject headings and page references. The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the front to the rear of the file.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The main foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the front cover, and terminates at the inside back cover; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. An additional foliation sequence is present in parallel between ff 6-247; these numbers are also written in pencil, and can be found in the same position as the main sequence, but they are not circled. A previous foliation sequence, which is also circled, has been superseded and therefore crossed out.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Confidential 86/7-IV B.40. Petroleum Concessions Limited - Trucial Coast.' [‎156r] (316/522), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/674, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100024250400.0x000075> [accessed 8 December 2019]

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