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‘File 29/21 - IV FOOD SUPPLY RICE' [‎5r] (9/194)

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The record is made up of 1 file (95 folios). It was created in 24 Sep 1949-21 Nov 1950. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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N
\:;\2 OCT ft49 J) i>
DOHA^^ ^HP A i
30th Se^tfinber 1949.
ji ' ’ i4 / 6/4s
X\l°
fit,
7 &<^C JoJu^Sj
Your 2569-29/21 of 26tH^September.
2. Abdullah Darv/ish 1 s account of his activities in
connection with this rice seems to have been quite frank,
and he has certainly kept me fully informed of the
consignment’s movements and of his professed intentions
with regard to its disposal. The Government of Q,atar has
not in the past taken any action itself to secure delivery
ot its quota supplies, - this was left in the hand of a
committee of the leading merchants. As the general supuly
position improved, these mainly lost interest and the
committee may now be considered moribund. Then "difficult**
commodities such as wheat and Egyptian rice were to be
handled, the committee,according to Abdullah, refused to
handle them, or at any rate were quite prepared to leave
him to handle them entirely at his own expense. This he
did, as he says because the P.A. pointed out to him that
if Qatar refused a quota when it was offered, the offer
might not be made again in time of need.
3. He therefore took a large shipment of wheat,
on v/hich he says he has lost about 80,000 rupees already
and is likely to lose more) and also agreed to handle this
Egyptian rice, w T hich is not in demand in Qatar except
amongst those too poor to be able to pick and choose. He
certainly does not stand to make much profit on it, as
he will be faced by competition from the more sought after
Persian varieties, the price of which is at present tending
to fall slightly. He is full of the most virtuous
protestations of his intention to give the stuff away to
the poor at cost price, with no profit for himself at all
etc etc., and I am inclined to believe him, because I
imagine it is a case of the virtue born of necessity.
4. His agreement with the shipping agents was for
delivery direct to Umm Sa’id, but in this he has been
frustrated by his failure to obtain a pilot (I am writing
separately about this). He hopes not to lose on the
shipping charges as the Agents accepted the cargo for
delivery to Qatar and the rice# was unloaded in Bahrain
against his w r ishes. In the circumstances I hope The
Bahrain Government can be persuaded not to levy transit
dues on this cargo which is a Qatar Government quota
which has gone astray by mischance. This might help me
in my efforts to get a proper !, Tamween' , sj^stem organised,
since at present I have no lever whatsoever, Abdullah
Darwish is in fact the country’s "Tamween" because he is
the only man with the money and ability to handle the stuff,
and the foresight to accept, even at the risk of a loss,
a cargo which the rest would prefer to refuse,and opportunities
of unloading as truck anything which he cannot dispose of
by any other means.
/As a result
H. G. Jakins Esq.,
H. ] . Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ,
Bahrain.

JCi

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Content

The file contains correspondence about British efforts to obtain supplies of rice for local consumption in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. shaikhdoms, particularly Bahrain, Qatar and the shaikhdoms of the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. , in the years after the Second World War (1939-1945). British and Bahrain Government officials disseminate details about offers of rice from the Government of Pakistan and also the allocation of Egyptian quota import rice from British Ministry of Food rice stores in Egypt. There is also extensive correspondence between the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain and the Political Officer for Qatar at Doha, about a prolonged dispute between Qatari and Bahraini merchants over the delayed transhipment of Egyptian quota import rice for Qatar, which had been landed at Bahrain.

The main correspondents are the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , both Bahrain; the Political Officers for Qatar and the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. ; the Adviser to the Government of Bahrain and the Director of Customs and Port Officer, Bahrain. The file also contains copy correspondence between Foreign Office and Ministry of Food officials in London about the latter’s decision to no longer procure rice from the Egyptian authorities for allocation to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. shaikhdoms after 1950, given the proposed winding up of the International Emergency Food Committee (IEFC) allocation system at the end of 1950.

Extent and format
1 file (95 folios)
Arrangement

Files papers are arranged more or less chronologically.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the main foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 97; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. An additional foliation sequence is present in parallel between ff 2-95; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled, and are located in the same position as the main sequence.

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English in Latin script
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‘File 29/21 - IV FOOD SUPPLY RICE' [‎5r] (9/194), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/780, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100025796015.0x00000a> [accessed 9 December 2019]

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