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'Report on the Administration of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1877-78.' [‎237v] (20/165)

The record is made up of 1 volume (81 folios). It was created in 1878. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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4 ADMINISTRATION REPORT OF THE PERSIAN GULF The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. POLITICAL RESIDENCE
result was that Odeyd became a resort of piratically inclined Bedouins,
such as the Beni-Hajir, and the Beni-Yas settlers became implicated in
irregular proceedings on the sea. To check this growing evil, as well
as in justice to the Trucial Chief of Afcu-Zhabi, it was decided by
the Government of India that he should be permitted to assert his
rightful authority at Odeyd and be supported in doing so. Efforts
to promote a friendly reconciliation between the Chief and the refrac
tory elan proved of no avail, and permission was accorded to Shaikh
Zaeed to take measures to assert his rights at Odeyd. The British
Agent was instructed to accompany the Chief of Abu-Zhabi to Odeyd,
and the Resident also proceeded to the spot in Her Majesty’s Ship Teazer
to exercise control over the proceedings, and, if necessary, to intervene;
but especially with the resolve to prevent any undue severities or cruelties
being resorted to.
11. The Odeyd tribe, however, removed from the place before the
arrival of the Abu-Zhabi Chief and the Teazer, after dismantling their
huts. As the Chief of Abu-Zhabi objects to any renewed settlement
at Odeyd, the place will remain uninhabited; and the wells having
been filled up, there will be no further attraction for predatory Arabs
of the neighbourhood to resort there. The Abu-Zhabi Chief, on his
side, acknowledges that he has now no plea for exemption from respon
sibility for the good order of that part of his territory.
12. The next port to the north on the Katr Coast is Wakrah, the
Chief of which has no treaty relations with the British Government,
and is supposed to claim the Turkish connection. Between Odeyd and
Wakrah intervenes a desert unpeopled waste.
3 .— Bahrein.
13. The Chief of these islands having during the year enjoyed
immunity from the apprehensions he has so often laboured under, from
the intrigues of external enemies, might be supposed to have leisure
to apply hirpself to the improvement of his internal administration.
But in point of fact this seems to have been more slack and careless
than usual, and petty robberies have so frequently occurred and passed
unpunished, that I considered it necessary, for the comfort and safety
of the Indian subjects residing in the islands, as well as in the
interests of the Chief himself, to urge on him the necessity of more
vigour and strictness in his government. Sheikh Fahad-bin-Ahmed,
cousin of the father of the present Chief, Eesa-bin Ali, having been
accused, or suspected, of intriguing against the Government, was put
to death by Sheikh Ahmed-bin Ali, the Chief’s brother, and his
personal effects confiscated. Two other murders have occurred during the
year. Haji Abdallah Ghallaf, once Wazeer, was found murdered in his
house, and some suspicion is said to rest on the present Wazeer, but no
steps have been taken to bring home the guilt. The other victim was
a villager, who was killed by a party of robbers, who have not been
traced or discovered.
14. The pearl banks were as productive as usual, but bad weather
interfered with the diving operations, and half the season was lost.

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Content

Administration report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for 1877-78, published by Authority at the Foreign Department Press, Calcutta [Kolkata], 1878. The report is based on reports sent by the Officiating Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. (Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Charles Ross) and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat (Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Barrett Miles) to the Government of India. The report is preceded by a copy of a letter sent by Ross to Alfred Comyn Lyall, Secretary to the Government of India, Foreign Department, dated 8 July 1878, which enclosed the submission of the original reports.

The report is organised in a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part I: General Report, signed by Ross, and arranged under subheadings as follows: Oman; Arab Coast; Bahrein [Bahrain]; Nejd [Najd]; Province of Fars and the Persian Coast and Islands; Bushire; Coast from Bushire to Lingah [Bandar Lengeh]; Lingah; Bunder Abbass [Bandar Abbas]; Persian-Baloochistan [Baluchistan] Coast; Bassidore [Bāsaʻīdū]; Establishments; Slave-Trade; Appendices (including meteorological tables, notes on the Kara Aghach River by Dr Friedrich Carl Andreas*, the route from Bushire to Lar and Shiraz, and the route from Lar to Shiraz, the Persian Post Office and Foreign Postage, and tables of Persian money and measurements).

Part II: Report on trade of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the year 1877, signed by Ross and arranged under subheadings, as follows: Effects of late war on the trade; Steam communication; Grain harvest; Scarcity of coin; Opium; Pearl fisheries; Impediments to development of trade in Persia; and appendices (including notes on the pearling industry by Captain Edward Law Durand, notes on date palm cultivation by James Charles Edwards, and 31 tables of trade statistics covering imports/exports from/to the various ports and settlements of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , and between the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and India).

Part III: Administration report of the Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , Muscat, for the year 1877-78, prepared by Miles and arranged under the following subheadings: Political; Official changes; Slave Traffic.

Part IV: Trade statistics for Muscat, prepared by Miles, and comprising of six tables covering imports, exports, and number and tonnage of vessels entering and leaving the port.

* Folio 246 - a map has been temporarily removed and replaced with a green sheet of paper noting its removal.

Extent and format
1 volume (81 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four parts (I-IV).

Physical characteristics

Pagination: The report has a pagination system which uses numbers printed in the top-left corner of versos and top-right corner of rectos.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Report on the Administration of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1877-78.' [‎237v] (20/165), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/32, No 152, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100026446897.0x000015> [accessed 21 April 2024]

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