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'File 1/A/38 I Negotiations with Bin Saud re:- Eastern boundary of Saudi Arabia with Qatar & Trucial Oman.' [‎59r] (122/452)

The record is made up of 1 volume (219 folios). It was created in 27 Oct 1934-24 Feb 1935. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS THE PROPERTY OF HIS BRITANNIC MAJESTY’S GOYERNMENT
EASTERN (Arabia). September 24, 1934.
CONFIDENTIAL. Section 4.
[E 5996/2429/25]
No. 1.
Fourth Meeting with Fuad Bey Hamza, held at the Foreign Office on the
September 24, 1934.
Note by Sir Andrew Ryan.
FUAD BEY, accompanied by Sheikh Hafiz Wahba, came to see me this
morning in accordance with the arrangement made at the third conversation, that
we should discuss separately the question of the Government of India’s
dispensaries in the Hejaz and possibly other minor questions.
2 . I explained to Fuad Bey that the question of the dispensaries, though
important, was non-political and concerned the Indian authorities. Mr. Rendel
had therefore asked me to go into the matter with himself and Sheikh Hafiz Wahba.
I reminded Fuad Bey that when he and I last discussed the question in Jedda we
had seemed to be approaching a solution, but the discussion had been interrupted
by his illness. The matter had now taken a new and less favourable turn, as the
Saudi Government had addressed a circular to Mr Calvert, in which they had
asked for separate statements of medical supplies imported for the use of members
of the Legation and those imported for general dispensary use, in order that
customs duty should be levied on the latter. I read to him the mam poitions ot
the telegraphic correspondence, and said that there appeared to be two miscon
ceptions viz., (a) the Saudi Government seemed to think that medical supplies
not intended for the use of the Legation staff were sold to the public, whereas m
fact the quantities of medicine supplied in return for payment were negligible,
and’(6) they seemed to think that Fuad Bey and I had dealt only with the status
of the Indian medical officers, whereas we had, m fact, dealt with the whole
question of the dispensaries.
3. I urged that the Saudi Government should not try to force the issue by
assuming that stores, other than those for the use of the members of the Legation
were liable to duty. The Jedda dispensary had existed for some fifty years, and
had always enjoyed immunity as part of the British mission. Moreover, the
Turkish Government had exempted from duty supplies imported by foreign
charitable institutions as such, not only those for diplomatic use. The b ^iic
dispensary at Mecca had been opened with Ibn Saud s approval m 1925. 1 here
was I admitted, no written record of this, as the arrangement had been made
between the King and the Indian vice-consul, but the best indication of the
King’s attitude at that time was that for the first year he had provided a house
free°of rent for the dispensary at Mecca. I was prepared, I said, to pursue the
question on the lines foreshadowed in my discussion with Fuad Bey at Jedda, but
I could not admit, pending a settlement, that supplies for the dispensaries were
liable to customs duty, and I deprecated the attempt of the Saudi Government to
enforce their own view in this respect before the whole matter had been thrashed
out. The case was a unique one, and while not claiming that the exemption could
be claimed under general international usage, there were strong reasons for
““TXid Bey suggested that no reliance could be placed on earlier precedent,
as the Treaty of‘Jedda had swept away all such precedents. I replied that the
Treaty of Jedda had not done this, but had said that our re ations were to be
based on principles of international law International law Question
established custom. I was quite prepared to seek a t y h °! ln n?f es f 0 r
but I suggested that customs immunity should be granted foi the supplies to
next pilgrimage season, in order that the present situation should be preserved
uitflot until we could work out the solution. # i •
5 ’ Fuad Bey said that he had had nothing on the subject from his Goverm
ment, and was not in a position to discuss it. I said tha yfU f“m
proposal, i.e., that the stores for next pilgrimage season should be exempted f 0
^206 aa—4]

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Content

The volume concerns the Eastern boundary of Saudi Arabia with Qatar and Trucial Oman (also referred to as the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. ), and negotiations over the boundary between British officials and Ibn Saud (referred to also as Bin Saud) [‘Abd al-‘Azīz bin ‘Abd al-Raḥmān bin Fayṣal Āl Sa‘ūd, King of Saudi Arabia].

The volume contains reports and correspondence, principally from the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; HM Minister, Jedda [Jeddah] (Sir Andrew Ryan); other Foreign Office officials; the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain; Bertram Sydney Thomas; and officials of the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. .

The papers include: extracts prepared by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , for the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , from a report by Bertram Thomas on the Trans-Oman air route reconnaissance of May-June 1927 (folios 8-21); papers on Anglo-Saudi relations and records of negotiations between HM Minister, Jeddah and the Deputy Saudi Arabian Minister for Foreign Affairs (Fuad Bey Hamza [Fu’ād Ḥamzah]), July-October 1934 (folios 37-60); further papers concerning Anglo-Saudi negotiations; papers prepared by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. (Lieutenant-Colonel Trenchard Craven William Fowle) concerning Ibn Saud and the Yemen campaign, November 1934 (folios 74-77); a letter from the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Muscat (Major Claude Edward Urquhart Bremner), dated 23 October 1934, concerning the boundaries of Muscat Sultanate (folios 78-80); a Foreign Office note dated 19 December 1934 entitled 'South-Eastern Arabian frontier and United States Oil Concessions' (folios 122-124); papers relating to the Blue Line [a line drawn by British and Turkish officials in 1913 from the Gulf of Uqair to parallel 20 degrees North, in the Rub al-Khali]; and papers concerning tribal affairs (e.g. report by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain (Lieutenant-Colonel Percy Gordon Loch) entitled 'Tribal situation in the Hinterland of the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. ', folios 140-146).

The date range gives the covering dates of the correspondence; the earliest document is an enclosure on folios 8-21 containing extracts from Bertram Thomas's report on the Trans-Oman air route reconnaissance of May-June 1927, and the last dated addition to the file is an entry in the notes dated 25 February 1935.

Extent and format
1 volume (219 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are filed in chronological order from the front to the back of the file, except where enclosures of an earlier date are filed after their relevant covering letter, and terminate in a set of notes (folios 211-216).

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the main foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 221; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. An additional foliation sequence is also present in parallel between ff 6-216; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled, and are located in same position as the main sequence.

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English in Latin script
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'File 1/A/38 I Negotiations with Bin Saud re:- Eastern boundary of Saudi Arabia with Qatar & Trucial Oman.' [‎59r] (122/452), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/157, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100026566622.0x00007b> [accessed 15 November 2019]

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