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File 3877/1912 Pt 4 ‘Turkey in Asia: oil concessions’ [‎38r] (17/176)

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The record is made up of 1 part (87 folios). It was created in 22 Apr 1914-15 Sep 1914. It was written in English and French. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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equity, but it is important to note that, though the contention as to the judicial
character of the Council of State’s decision was pressed upon us by one of the members
of the Council and we were ourselves doubtful of it, I, who dealt with the case to some
extent, felt strong doubts whether our support could be based on that ground, and
^ir G. Lowther, who spoke about the case to Hakki Pasha, then Grand Vizier, left a
note to the effect that his Highness disputed the contention. The matter was one in
which we were not disposed to go very far, as certain British parties were also interested
on the other side, and in any case it lapsed as far as the embassy was concerned. I do
not know what eventually happened, but the material point is that in 1911, in a case |
which was distinctly one of interpreting a law for a purpose of civil administration, the
Grand Vizier repudiated the view that a decision of the Council of State bound the
Government, and that the British Embassy did not feel any confidence that that
contention could be maintained, though we were disposed to think that Messrs. WhittalTs
case was in itself a good one.
In the present instance the arguments against regarding the Council of State’s
decision as a judicial and binding one are certainly not less strong than in the case just
related. From one point of view it may be said that they are a good deal stronger, as
the question before the Council of State was not one of interpreting “ a ” law, but
rather of determining whether a particular sovereign act of the late Sultan’s, done at a
time when he was the sole source of law in the Empire, was invalidated by other
enactments, which, as I pointed out above, can be said to have had themselves no higher
sanction.
ANDBEW RYAN.
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Correspondence and papers relating to claims for exploratory oil licenses in Ottoman Turkey (including the vilayets of Baghdad, Mosul and Basra in Mesopotamia [Iraq], and Syria and Nejd). Principal correspondents include: the solicitors Treherne, Higgins and Company, who represent the oil explorer Roland H Silley; representatives of the Central Mining and Investment Corporation Limited (L Reynolds; Louis Julius Reyersbach); Foreign Office (FO) officials (Sir Eyre Alexander Barby Wichart Crowe; Sir Louis Du Pan Mallet).

  • correspondence concerning Silley’s claims (competing with those made by the D’Arcy Group and Anglo-Persian Oil Company) over mining rights in the Mesopotamian vilayets of Mosul and Baghdad, an historical précis of which can be found in a letter dated 14 May 1914 from Treherne, Higgins & Company to the Foreign Office (ff 111-112);
  • correspondence concerning Silley’s attempts to secure oil licenses in Nejd, Silley’s efforts to contact the prospective Vali of Nejd, Bin Saud (‘Abd al-‘Azīz bin ‘Abd al-Raḥmān bin Fayṣal Āl Sa‘ūd), and discussion amongst FO officials over the prospects of the Turkish Petroleum Company (in large part financed by Deutsche Bank and the Dutch Anglo-Saxon Oil Company) having a presence in Arabia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ;
  • a note, written by Sulaiman Nassif, enclosed with a letter dated 27 April 1914, on petroleum prospecting concession licenses in Syria (f 105).
Extent and format
1 part (87 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front.

Written in
English and French in Latin script
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File 3877/1912 Pt 4 ‘Turkey in Asia: oil concessions’ [‎38r] (17/176), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/10/302/2, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100028929398.0x000057> [accessed 22 November 2019]

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