Skip to item: of 416
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Adminisistration [Administration] Reports 1931-1935' [‎152r] (303/416)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 volume (206 folios). It was created in 1932-1936. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

53
contrabandists’ activities. Why, says Kuwait, should she “ be left with Iraq’s
baby ” or why should she “ poke out her eye with her own finger
6. Kuwait further argues that she has no local industries, except the pearl
trade which since five years has gone. Nor does she manufacture anything or
grow her food. Unless she can sell something to somebody, she can get no
money to buy even her food and clothes, which all come from India.
7. Bin Saud’s “ blockade ” has reduced her Customs revenue from 13 lacs One lakh is equal to one hundred thousand rupees
to 1 lac One lakh is equal to one hundred thousand rupees of Kupees in 10 years, Persia refuses to trade legitimately with Kuwait,
and now Iraq requests Kuwait to stop her trade with the hinterland tribesmen.
What, she says, will be left of her trade and how is she to make the money
necessary to pay for her food from overseas.
8. Both sides naturally have something to be said for them, but in the
writer’s view the Kuwait arguments easily win, since Kuwait’s very existence
is at stake. Iraq’s existence is on the contrary in no way threatened, also she
is rich, and almost entirely self-supporting.
9. Qn 5th May 1934 four Iraq armoured cars entered Kuwait territory and
for some 10 days roamed about beating and frightening the nomad population on
the pretext that they were looking for Iraq contraband runners. When the
necessary protests were made, the Iraq Government deified the allegation. Re
ports on the subject will be found elsewhere. There were also one or two other
instances 'which might have brought about a state of strained relations but which
fortunately were cooly dealt with by H. E. the Shaikh. These included :
(a) The cruising about in the Khor Subiyeh (Kuwait waters) of an Iraq
armed customs launch on 18th April 1934 and the firing upon and
seizure of two Kuwait woodcutters boats.
(b) The shooting and killing of an innocent Kuwait beduoin near Jebel
Sanarn (site of the outrage well inside Kuwait territory), and the
arrest and detention of his companion on 4th August. The men
were actually travellers with no baggage and the aggressors were
the crew of an armed car.
(c) The cruising about in Kuwait waters south of Warba Island on 31st
October of an Iraqi armed launch, and the firing on a party of the
Shaikh’s falconers camped on the aforesaid Island.
An informal conference between Iraqi representatives and H. E. the Shaikh
of Kuwait was held in Kuwait on 23rd September under the aegis ot the
Hon’ble Lt.-Col. G. Loch, the acting Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. . The [raqi reprosen a-
tives were Dr. Naji Beg a! Asil and Tahsm Beg Ah, Mutasarnf ot Bam a. Ihe
results of the conversations held were unfortunately ml.
JX —Relations with Persia.
These have been satisfactory on the whole, though the trade policy of Iran
as made it so impossible for Kuwaiti merchants to do any business with that
mntry that all legitimate trade may be said to be now dead.
X.—Oil
m i- T -rvrm-nanv an Anglo-American concern on 23rd December
ilic Kuwait Dil Dompairy, & /Vhfsnnarl nil concession
34, and after long and protracted negotiations, obtained an oil
>rn His Excellency the Shaikh.
XL—Agency “Charitable ” Dispensary.
(a) Was managed efficiently by Assistant Surgeon A. L. Oreenway,
RCP MR OS I.M.D., during the year under ie\ic .
' {If) The attendance of patients as compared with the previous 2 years was
follows Out-door.
1932
1933
1931
10,015
14,310
10,452

About this item

Content

The volume includes Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1931 (Simla, Government of India Press: 1932); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1932 (Simla: Government of India Press, 1933); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1933 (Simla: Government of India Press, 1934); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1934 (Simla: Government of India Press, 1935); and Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1935 (New Delhi: Government of India Press, 1936). The Report for 1935 shows some manuscript corrections.

The Administration Reports are divided into chapters relating to the various Agencies, Consulates, and other administrative areas that made up the Bushire Political Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. . Within the chapters there are sections devoted to reviews by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. ; lists of senior personnel; foreign representatives; local government; military and marine affairs; movements of Royal Navy ships; aviation; political developments; slavery; trade and commerce; medical reports and sanitation; meteorological reports and statistics; communications; naval matters; the Royal Air Force; notable events; and related information.

Extent and format
1 volume (206 folios)
Arrangement

The Reports are bound in chronological order from the front to the rear of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation system in use commences at 1 on the front cover and continues through to 208 on the back cover. The sequence is written in pencil, enclosed in a circle, and appears in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Adminisistration [Administration] Reports 1931-1935' [‎152r] (303/416), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/715, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100030356105.0x000068> [accessed 22 July 2024]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100030356105.0x000068">'Adminisistration [Administration] Reports 1931-1935' [&lrm;152r] (303/416)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100030356105.0x000068">
	<img src="https://iiif.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002b1/IOR_R_15_1_715_0303.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002b1/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image