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File 345/1908 Pt 2 'Mohammerah: situation. Sheikh's dispute with the Vali of Basra. decoration for Sheikh. renewed assurances to Sheikh.' [‎155v] (315/566)

The record is made up of 1 volume (281 folios). It was created in 1910-1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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18
Foreign Office said about this Mohammerah business. I said we were glad to
hear he had effected a reconciliation with the Sheikh and were obliged to him for
meeting us in the matter. I had already communicated the views not of myself,
but of His Majesty’s Government on this subject to the Acting Wali. I had
received many telegrams from the Foreign Office, our Embassy at Constantinople
and the Legation at Tehran, and all agreed on the necessity of arranging matters
amicably between himself and the Sheikh. His Majesty’s Government wished
the affair dealt with locally, and I now desired, with his permission, to communi
cate the instructions l had received. As to the matters in dispute His Excellency
had communicated directly with the Sheikh, letters had been exchanged
and friendly relations re-established. I had twice written privately to His
Excellency regarding some expression of regret on his part to the Sheikh for his
personal family trouble. His Majesty’s Government thought it would be well, in
order to strengthen and confirm the good understanding now arrived at, “ if His
Excellency would express in a friendly and private manner his regret, that is
to say, his condolences for the personal injury sustained by the Sheikh, namely,
the death of his wife, and the discomfort caused to his mother and would assure
the Sheikh that, if he kept ( his promises, his tribes andh is property on Ottoman soil
would not be molested.” I read this passage to him and offered to give my
Turkish translation, but he said he prefered to have it verbally. I also carefully
explained to him that His Majesty’s Government did not ask for an apology fof
what had occurred but simply an expression of regret for the Sheikh’s private
trouble, and I pointed out that, although we fully realised the difficulties of the
Turkish Government on the river, we were old friends with the Sheikh as with
Turkey, and if we had not protected the Sheikh in his dealings with the Persian
Government, Mohatnmerah and Arabistan would have gone to the dogs long ago.
We were deeply interested in Arabistan where we had about half a million of
capital invested, and we wanted no quarrels between the Governors of Basrah
and Mohammerah. We were prepared to use our influence with the Sheikh
to keep him from fomenting disturbances on the Turkish side, but if he did not
keep his promise we should certainly not protect him.
The Wali answered that he had practically fulfilled the second part of our
request as he had written privately to the Sheikh on the preceding day and
assured him of his friendship and good will and protection of his affairs in Turkey
and assurances to the same effect were given in the last paragraph of his previous
letter, (see enclosure 3 in my despatch No 26, of May 14th, to the Embassy),
but he firmly, though politely, declined to write anything to the Sheikh in the
form of condolence or regret for the Sheikh’s personal concerns, with which, he
said, he had nothing to do. He declared himself convinced that his action at
Zain was justified and fully vindicated by past history on the river and, as the
action was undertaken on behalf of his Government and had nothing personal
about it, any personal expression of regret on his part would be useless and
meaningless.
I replied that His Excellency must decide for himself and that I could do
no more than reiterate the express wishes of His Majesty’s Government, which
I had been instructed to explain to him, and I would communicate his views to
Constantinople.
I again visited Abdul Wahab el Kartassat Saraji on the morning of the 9th
instant and he told me he had spent several hours with the Sheikh of Moham
merah at Failiyah on the preceding day and had read the Wall’s private letter,
which, he said, was friendly and conciliatory. He said good relations were
restored and the breach healed. 1 consider Abdul Wahab’s opinion of value.
He is an important personage here and an intimate friend of Sheikh Khazal, and
is well aware of the difficulties the Turks have had in the past years with
Mohammerah. No man in Basrah knows the position better and, when friendly
meetings between Arab Sheikhs and Turkish Walis occur, they are generally
held at his house. Please see my despatch to the Embassy No, 14, of March
9th last, to which the Resident at Bushire recently referred in his telegrams.
I have, etc.,
F. E. CROW.
His Excellency the Right Hon’ble Sir G, A. Lowther, K.C.M.G., C.B.,
etc., etc., etc.
f

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Content

Correspondence including telegrams, hand written letters and printed enclosures, discusses an attack by a Turkish gun-boat on a village - Zain, belonging to the Shaikh of Mohammerah - which lay on the Turkish bank of the Shatt al-Arab waterway. The correspondence outlines the circumstances that led to the quarrel between the Turkish authorities and the Sheikh of Mohammerah, and suggestions that the Porte should be urged to replace the Wali of Basrah with a less aggressive official.

Correspondence discusses the proposal to give the Shaikh of Mohammerah assurances against naval attack, whatever the pretext for such action; letters and telegrams also discuss the award of a decoration (Knight Commander of the Indian Empire) to the Shaikh of Mohammerah.

A letter (dated 7 December 1913) from Percy Zachariah Cox, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , outlines the Government of India's interests in Arabistan including: the oil fields and their future; irrigation; railway enterprises; telegraphs; Russian and German activity.

Correspondents include Percy Zachariah Cox, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; Sir Gerard Lowther, Ambassador to Constantinople; Charles Murray Marling, Ambassador to Tehran; Sir Edward Grey, Secretary of State for Foreign affairs; Francis Edward Crow, H M Consul at Bussorah [Basra]; Arnold Talbot Wilson, H M Consul at Mohammerah; Shaikh Khazal bin Jabir, Shaikh of Mohammerah; Wali of Bussorah; Viceroy of India.

Extent and format
1 volume (281 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the volume. The subject 345 (Mohammerah: situation) consists of two volumes, IOR/L/PS/10/132-133. The volumes are divided into two parts, with each part comprising one volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at the first folio with 1 and terminates at the last folio with 278; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

The folio sequence does not include the front and back covers, nor does it include the one ending flyleaf.

An additional foliation sequence is also present in parallel throughout; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled.

Written in
English in Latin script
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File 345/1908 Pt 2 'Mohammerah: situation. Sheikh's dispute with the Vali of Basra. decoration for Sheikh. renewed assurances to Sheikh.' [‎155v] (315/566), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/10/133, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100030525714.0x000074> [accessed 26 June 2019]

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