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Coll 6/64 'South-Eastern Boundaries in [Arabia] – Anglo-Turkish Convention of 1913. Attitude of U.S.A.' [‎90v] (180/183)

The record is made up of 1 file (90 folios). It was created in 29 Jul 1913-27 Jul 1934. It was written in English, French and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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38
Ratified by his Excellency the Viceroy and Governor-General
of India at Simla on the 12th day of May, 1892.
II. M. Durand,
Secretary to the Government
of India, Foreign Department.
(The agreements signed by the other trucial sheikhs, viz., the
Chiefs of Dabai, Ajman, Shargah, Ras-uI-Khima, and Umm-ul-
Gawain, the first three dated the 7th and the last two the
8th March, 1892, are identical in form.)
(26.)
Agreement for the Prohibition of Traffic in Arms.
We, the undersigned trucial chiefs, agree to absolutely prohibit
the importation of arms for sale into our respective territories or
the exportation therefrom, and to enforce this we have issued a
notification to all concerned.
MAKTOOM-BIN-HASHAR (Debai).
SAGAR-BIN-KHALED (Shargah).
RASHID-BIN-AHMED (Um-el-Kowain.)
ABDUL AZIZ-BIN-HOM A ID (Ajman).
ZAEED-BIN-KHALIFAH (Abu Dthabi).
Signed and sealed in my presence by the above-mentioned
trucial chiefs on board the R.I.M.S. “Lawrence ” on the 24th, 25th,
and 26th November, 1902.
C. A. KEMBALL, Lieutenant-Colonel,
Officiating Political Pesident, Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
Notification referred to in the foregoing Agreement.
Be it known to all that whereas it has become known to us
that the traffic in arms in British India is prohibited, and as we
are of opinion that the traffic if continued is likely to be prejudicial
to the interests of our territories, we have therefore decided to do
all that lies in our power to put a stop to this illegal traffic, and
we hereby declare that from the date of this notification the
importation of arms and ammunition into our respective territories
and the exportation of the same are absolutely prohibited.
All arms and ammunition so imported or exported in future
will be seized and confiscated.
o

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Content

This file relates to boundaries in eastern Arabia (specifically Saudi Arabia and Qatar). It concerns British policy regarding what is referred to as the 'blue line' (the frontier which marked the Ottoman Government's renunciation of its claims to Bahrain and Qatar, as laid down in the non-ratified Anglo-Ottoman Convention of 1913 and redefined and adopted in the Anglo-Ottoman Convention of the following year).

Much of the correspondence relates to a request for a copy of the 1913 Anglo-Ottoman Convention, which was submitted by the United States Embassy in Angora [Ankara] to its British counterpart (reportedly on behalf of the United States' State Department), as well as to the wider significance of this request in relation to the United States' oil interests in the region.

The correspondence also discusses Foreign Office concerns that aerial survey work carried out by the California Arabian Standard Oil Company (Casoc) in relation to its Hasa oil concession might extend beyond the blue line (subsequent correspondence relays reports of Casoc's aeroplane having crossed the blue line).

Although the date range of the file is 1913-1934 most of the material dates from 1934. In addition to correspondence from 1934, the file includes two letters between officials of the Foreign Office and the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. dating from 1924, and printed copies of the Anglo-Ottoman Conventions of 1913 and 1914 (in English and French), both of which contain enclosed maps (with text in English and Arabic). Also included with the Conventions are printed copies of agreements and treaties between Britain and various Gulf rulers, covering 1820-1904, and printed copies of Anglo-Ottoman protocols, covering 1903-1905.

Notable correspondents include the following: the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Lieutenant-Colonel Trenchard Craven William Fowle); the British Ambassador in Angora (Percy Loraine); Hugh Millard, United States Embassy, London; officials of the Foreign Office and the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. .

The file includes a divider which gives a list of correspondence references contained in the file by year. This is placed at the back of the correspondence (folio 2).

Extent and format
1 file (90 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the file.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the last folio with 91; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

Written in
English, French and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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Coll 6/64 'South-Eastern Boundaries in [Arabia] – Anglo-Turkish Convention of 1913. Attitude of U.S.A.' [‎90v] (180/183), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/12/2131, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100039921442.0x0000b7> [accessed 14 November 2019]

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