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Coll 6/67(4) 'Boundaries of South Eastern Arabia and Qatar.' [‎106v] (212/843)

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The record is made up of 1 file (420 folios). It was created in 12 Nov 1935-27 Sep 1937. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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we had modified our attitude in order to show our friendship for the King. But
what was the position of the Saudi Government ? They had put forward, on the
3rd April, 1935, a line, which I showed Sheikh Yusuf on the map, from which
they had never retreated an inch. I was no supporter of a policy oi bargaining,
and I did not believe in progressive concessions. But now that the new lines were
so close to each other as to approximate within a few miles, I felt the time had
really come for the Saudi to make some concession too and reciprocate the con
ciliatory spirit we ourselves had shown. There was really now very little between us
but, as Sheikh Yusuf would realise from what I had said earlier in the discussion
we really could make no further concession. Sir Reader warmly endorsed this
appeal and the conversation concluded with a renewed promise from the Sheikh to
refer the whole matter to the King without delay.
G. W. RENDEL.
Jedda, March 20, 1937.
Appendix to Enclosure 1.
Note for Sheikh Yusuf Vasin.
Odeid.
1. 1878. Sheikh Zaid of Abu Dhabi was assisted by Her Majesty’s
Government to send an expedition to exterminate the pirates of Odeid. The
pirates fled before the expedition arrived, but it was made clear that Her Majesty’s
Government regarded the Sheikh of Abu Dhabi as responsible for what happened
at Odeid and recognised that place as his territory.
2. 1881. Sheikh Yasin bin Thani of Qatar was told, in reply to his
enquiries, that Her Majesty's Government could not agree to his rebuilding Odeid
“ as the ylace is an appanage of A bu Dhabi."
3. 1890. The Turks tried to send a mudir to Odeid, but on his arrival at
Bahrein, Her Majesty's Government immediately made diplomatic representations
to the Porte, on the ground that Odeid belonged to Abu Dhabi, and the Turks
abandoned their project in consequence and the mudir was recalled.
4. The correspondence of 1904-6, ending with Sir Percy (then Major) Cox’s
letter of the 1st December, 1906, to Sheikh Zaid bin Khalifa of Abu Dhabi, the
first twx) paragraphs of which read as follows :—
“ Y r ou will remember that on the last occasion on which we met you asked
your friend to look again into the question of the reoccupation of Odeid by
you and to make a reference to Government in the matter.
“ I did as you requested. The Government have given careful
consideration of the question and I am desired to tell you that while they
recognise that the place is in your territory and are prepared to prevent its
occupation by any one else, but yourself they are not satisfied that its
reoccupation by you would have any good or peaceful result, and for that
reason are not inclined to assist you in reoccupying the place."
Enclosure 2.
( 1 )
Sir R. Bullard to Sheikh Yusuf Yasin.
Dear Sheikh Yusuf Yasin, Jedda, March 27, 1937.
IN your letter of the 23rd March you kindly sent me a note in which His
Majesty King Abdul Aziz was so good as to develop the statements which His
Majesty had made during the conversations with Mr. Rendel and myself, about
the Arab territories on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and about the question of trade through
the ports on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . I am sending a translation of that note to the
Foreign Office immediately and I am sure that it will be considered by His
Majesty s Government, like all the communications from His Majesty, with close
and sympathetic attention.
Yours, &c.
R. W. BULLARD.

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Content

This file primarily concerns British policy regarding the eastern and south-eastern boundaries of Saudi Arabia, specifically those bordering Qatar, Abu Dhabi, and Muscat (i.e. the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman).

Much of the correspondence relates to British concerns that the boundaries should be demarcated prior to the commencement of any oil prospecting in the area. The file's principal correspondents are the following: His Majesty's Minister at Jedda (Sir Andrew Ryan, succeeded by Sir Reader William Bullard); the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Lieutenant-Colonel Trenchard Craven William Fowle); the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain (Lieutenant-Colonel Percy Gordon Loch); the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Muscat (Major Ralph Ponsonby Watts); the Secretary of State for the Colonies; the Secretary of State for India; the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs; officials of the Foreign Office, the Colonial Office, the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , and the Admiralty.

Matters discussed in the correspondence include the following:

  • Whether the British should press King Ibn Saud [‘Abd al-‘Azīz bin ‘Abd al-Raḥmān bin Fayṣal Āl Sa‘ūd] for a settlement of the outstanding questions relating to the aforementioned boundaries.
  • Sir Andrew Ryan's meeting with Ibn Saud and the Deputy Minister for Saudi Foreign Affairs, Fuad Bey Hamza, in Riyadh, in November 1935.
  • The disputed territories of Jebel Naksh [Khashm an Nakhsh, Qatar] and Khor-al-Odeid [Khawr al ‘Udayd].
  • Whether or not a territorial agreement between Ibn Saud and Qatar was concluded prior to the Anglo-Qatar Treaty of 1916.
  • The intentions of Petroleum Concessions Limited regarding the development of its oil concession in Qatar.
  • The line proposed by the British for the boundary between Saudi Arabia and the Aden Protectorate.
  • The Kuwait blockade.
  • Leading personalities in Oman.
  • Details of Harry St John Bridger Philby's expedition to Shabwa [Shabwah, Yemen].
  • Four meetings held between Sir Reader Bullard, George Rendel (Head of the Foreign Office's Eastern Department), and Ibn Saud, in Jedda, 20-22 March 1937.

Also included are the following:

The file includes a divider which gives a list of correspondence references contained in the file by year. This is placed at the back of the correspondence (folio 2).

Extent and format
1 file (420 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the file.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the last folio with 421; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. A previous foliation sequence, which is also circled, has been superseded and therefore crossed out.

Written in
English in Latin script
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Coll 6/67(4) 'Boundaries of South Eastern Arabia and Qatar.' [‎106v] (212/843), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/12/2137, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100049619516.0x00000f> [accessed 23 October 2019]

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