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File 1110/1916 Pt 3 'German War: Persia' [‎161v] (327/354)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (173 folios). It was created in 1916. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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249
Telegram R., No. 1123, dated the 18th (received 19th) May 1916.
Prom The Deputy Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , Bushire,
To—The Secretary to the Government of India in the Foreign and Political
Department, Simla.
My telegram No. rood* clause 1.
I find tRat owing to an oversight at Basrah four Targistani prisoners who
have remained there were not included in total. Consequently there are
13 Tangistani prisoners and not nine as erroneously stated in abovementioned
telegram.
Addressed to Tehran ; repeated to Basrah.
250
Telegram P., No. 342 F., dated tne 18th (received 19tb) May 1916.
From—His Britannic Majesty’s Minister at Tehran,
To—The Secretary to the Government of India in the Foreign and Political Depart
ment, Simla.
Please refer to telegram 2281 from Cox. He thinks me inconsistent
apparently, hut he has not sufficiently noted change of conditions, I think.
Operations by our troops inland has been consistently opposed by Government
of India so that I was forced to conclusion that only instrument in our hands
against Khans was Soulet-ed-Dowleh, in the absence of any intimation to the
contrary and with season advanced beyond time indicated in Bushire telegram
179—1032 (1 ?).
There seemed fair prospect of securing his assistance up to April 22nd
and even after. To re-establish his loyalty in eyes of Persian Government and
ourselves was clearly in his interests and he expressed his readiness to act.
Then came a change in his attitude. Kawam’s death gave him greater import
ance : he saw his own importance and before taking steps began to bargain
asking for £20,000 down. Persian Government and all our friends here were
convinced that he would take money and do nothing, and begged me not to
agree. In this attitude he was also confirmed by the Chagedak raid and scuttle,
as it led him to think that we had no serious intention of taking action our
selves. It came, however, to his knowledge that we knew all his connections
with rebel Khans and he has now doubt of our attitude towards him. Nor does
the raid appear to have impressed the hostile Khans themselves : all Persian
opinion here condemns it as a dangerous (expedient ?) and the question has been
put to us whether military authorities had no consideration for life of Consul.
Proper policy was strong line with Khans so long as we had a fair prospect of
backing it up by force but no longer. Not that 1 have yet abandoned it, as
with appointment of Parman Parma I can discern slight alteration for the
better in Soulet-ed-Dowleh, to obtain whose co-operation I am making further
attempt with Farman Parma’s advice and with Kawam’s support locally.
But if it fails and if His Majesty’s Government is not prepared to take
adequate action at Bushire, we must either (as it appears to me) negotiate with
Khans and make considerable concession or else resign ourselves to leaving
captives in hands of Khans in circumstances of great hardship for large part of
summer with no corresponding advantage to ourselves.
Indication that some kind of action from Bushire is under consideration
has just reached me. I trust that this is so and that it will be adequate. I
shall continue my negotiations with Soulet-ed-Dolweh (from whom I expect
to get a reply in a day or two) in the meantime.
Addressed Poreign Office; repeated Cox, Trevor.

About this item

Content

The volume comprises telegrams, despatches, correspondence, memoranda, and notes, on miscellaneous topics relating to Persia, April to June 1916.

The discussion in the volume includes the following topics:

  • Decoration for the Persian Foreign Minister and Farman Farma for his military support of the British
  • Turkish advance and defeat on Kermanshah road
  • the Russian defeat and withdrawal towards Hamadan
  • the Russian advance on and defeat at Khanikin.

The volume contains correspondence between: the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; HBM Minister, Tehran; the Viceroy; and the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, London.

The volume includes a divider which gives the subject number, the year the subject file was opened, the subject heading, and a list of correspondence references by year. This is placed at the back of the correspondence.

Extent and format
1 volume (173 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the volume.

The subject 1110 (Persia) consists of three volumes, IOR/L/PS/10/590-592. The volumes are divided into three parts, with each part comprising one volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 175; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

Written in
English in Latin script
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File 1110/1916 Pt 3 'German War: Persia' [‎161v] (327/354), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/10/592, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100055634098.0x000080> [accessed 5 December 2019]

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