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'Report of Khan Bahadur Maula Bakhsh, Attaché to the Agent to the Governor General of India and Her Britannic Majesty's Consul-General for Khurasan and Sistan, on His Journey from Meshed to Quetta via Turbat-i-Haidari, Kain, Sistan, Kuh-i-Malik Siah and Nushki (7th April to 28th July 1898)' [‎57v] (119/156)

The record is made up of 1 volume (74 folios). It was created in 1898. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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92
KEPORT OF KHAN BAHADUR MAULA BAKTJSH
marched them off to Kirman, as well as the case of Yawar Abbas Khan, who
proceeded the other day from Bampur to
See paragraphs 129(a), 132, 132(5), and 132(c). g ar had to leVV taxes and whose advent
so alarmed the Chiefs that all of them, including the dreadful Jhiand, hastened
to pay homage to him and escorted him about helping him in imprisoning
headmen and levying blackmail are ample proofs in confirmation of the above
statements.
(p) In conclusion, I may lay stress on the point that it is generally ad-
Baiuch chiefs in league with Persian officials in mitted by Saihadis and believed firmly
connection with raids, thefts, and robberies. foy Persian officials in Nell and Sistdn
and with perfect truth, that the Baluch Chiefs in Sarhad who cause raids’
thefts, and robberies to be committed are in league with the Persian officials
at Bampur, Khash, and Nasratabad who receive a share of the stolen property
and get slaves for their households free of charge. Now and then a Persian
official, if called upon by the Governor-General of Kirman to recover stolen
property, does recover it partly, and sometimes, perhaps, wholly, in order to get
a reward or promotion from the Persian Government. Whenever he does so
he invariably takes care to protect the Chief by making out that the theft was
committed without the latter’s knowledge or offering some other excuse.
Whether every theft or robbery is committed with the previous know
ledge or sanction of the Baluch Chief or Persian official or not, it seems to be
certain that whenever a theft or robbery is committed the Baluch Chief, whose
tribesmen or adherents have committed it, as w r ell as the Persian officials near
whose territories the occurrence takes place come to know at once who the
perpetrators are, and instead of recovering the stolen property and restoring
the same to its owner they accept shares or presents from the thieves and
connive at the matter. In most cases they do not recover anything, even
wffien the owners complain to them, on the plea that either they cannot trace
the thieves or have no control over them.
(q) Were the actual state of affairs brought to the notice of the Persian
Measures necessary for the prevention of thefts, Government and Ordd’S Caused to 1)6
robberies, and raids by the people of Sarhad in order issued to the Governor-General of Kirman
to insure the safety of the new trade route. itt mr • , . i . • /
through Her Majesty’s Consul at Kirman
warning him that he (the Governor-General of Kirman) would be held
personally responsible and made to pay compensation from bis own pocket for
any robbery or theft committed by Sarhad Baluchis in territory under British
control, it w ould, in my humble opinion, put a stop to all occurrences of that
sort, since the Governor-General of Kirman would, in his turn hold, the Persian
officials at Bampur, Khash, and Nasratabad responsible, and the latter would
be compelled, in self-defence, to force the local Sarhad Chiefs to adopt effective
measures to keep their adherents and tribesmen under proper control. Thus
the safety of the new trade route would be insured, wdiich w r ould be a blessing
to all caravans and travellers. Though, for some time past, no raids have
)een committed between Bubat-i-Kuh-i-Malik Siah and Amir Chah, it is
possible the trans-frontier raiders might break out again anv day, as Sardar Leader of a tribe or a polity; also refers to a military rank or title given to a commander of an army or division.
u lammad Pieza Khan Reki, the Chief of the Khasadars, between Rubat and
Saindak, is unable to resist Yar Ahmadzais or Damanis.
Jhiand, the Yar Ahmadzai Chief, having heard of Sarddr Muhammad
eza Khan s success, is said to he anxious to enter British service and to have
submitted a petition to the Political Assistant, Chaghi district, on the subject.
tii'p oaf f 6 f\i ° ^ ai, j l ^i 1S ob j ect ’ be Biake himself hostile and endanger
eyo re load, because he knows that the Persian Government are
taking no steps to prevent lawlessness.
Monday, 27th June 1898.
137. Amir C!<dh (Thdna).
Time taken by laden camels, 12 hours.
Distance, 21 miles.
Water, good, from two wells.
Camel-grazing and fire-wood plentiful.
Supplies procurable from the Thana.

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Content

Report by Khan Bahadur Maula Bakhsh on his journey from Meshed to Quetta in 1898. The report starts with a description of the circumstances that gave rise to the journey and the preparations before departure (folios 12-17). The main body of the report consists of his account of the journey, written in diary form (folios 17-66). The last part of the report is formed of tables of data gathered during the journey (folios 67-72). The report contains information on distances, water, supplies, trade, human and physical geography, road conditions, and revenues.

Extent and format
1 volume (74 folios)
Arrangement

At the beginning of the volume is a table of contents arranged by subject with reference to the paragraph number.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 76; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Report of Khan Bahadur Maula Bakhsh, Attaché to the Agent to the Governor General of India and Her Britannic Majesty's Consul-General for Khurasan and Sistan, on His Journey from Meshed to Quetta via Turbat-i-Haidari, Kain, Sistan, Kuh-i-Malik Siah and Nushki (7th April to 28th July 1898)' [‎57v] (119/156), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/363, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100060432561.0x000078> [accessed 23 April 2024]

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