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Coll 30/18(1) 'Persian Gulf: Bahrein, Customs dues on goods in transit; attitude of Ibn Saud' [‎442r] (888/1162)

The record is made up of 1 volume (576 folios). It was created in 23 Apr 1920-31 Oct 1934. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

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and since it was not a formal treaty but a private arrangement
and since he received no compensating advantage, it is clearly
open to the son to rescind a concession granted by the father*
Bahrain, as we have frequently stated, is an Independent Arab
State and has a perfect right tc levy such dues and make
such arrangements in its territorial waters as may seem good
to it* As I have mentioned above, the Resident himself stated
that the usual practice of States was to take what could be
taken without killing the goose that lays the golden eggs*
12. Y/hen the concession was originally forced upon Shaikh
Isa, much play was made of the argument that other ports such
as Bombay charged nothing for transhipment, itfhat is done
elsewhere is of little value as a guide in a place like the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , which is a law unto itself, but apart from this
the argument is fallacious for the transhipment referred to in
these ports is that of cargo on a through manifest for onward
transmission by another steamer to another steamer port*
Bahrain is strictly speaking the destination of transhipment
cargo here,for the mainland ports cannot by any stretch of
imagination be called steamer ports nor do the merchants who
ship the cargo live there.
13. The Port of London and other great ports grant cheap
transit facilities because it suits their policy to do su,
and if they did not rival ports shoulc soon take the.r
entrepot trade from them. The situation here is entires
different. The Hasa and hejd merchants who import on a
large scale do not live in their own country, but prefer to
conduct their business from the peace and security of Bahrain
They take full advantage of the facilities of the port, and
send their children free to Bahrain sbhools, use Bahrain
. , . potion of the Bahrain State
hospitals and enjoy the protect.cu ux
forces.
• •

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Content

This volume contains correspondence between British officials regarding complications around the payment of transit fees to Bahrain (sometimes written as Bahrein in the file) by Saudi Arabia and its precursor states, the Kingdom of Nejd and Hejaz (1926-1932) and the Sultanate of Nejd (1921-27). The correspondence also discusses relations between the two countries generally and the role of Britain.

The correspondence is between officials at the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , Foreign Office, Board of Trade, British Legation in Jeddah, Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and the Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in Bahrain. A limited amount of correspondence is also contained with non-British individuals including the Ruler of Bahrain, Shaikh Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa, some of which is in Arabic (with English translations).

In addition to correspondence, the volume contains occasional extracts from Intelligence Reports compiled by the Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in Bahrain and the following documents:

The volume includes a divider, which gives a list of correspondence references contained in the volume by year. This is placed at the back of the correspondence.

Extent and format
1 volume (576 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the first folio with 1 and terminates at the last folio with 579; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. The foliation sequence does not include the front and back covers, nor does it include the leading and ending flyleaves.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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Coll 30/18(1) 'Persian Gulf: Bahrein, Customs dues on goods in transit; attitude of Ibn Saud' [‎442r] (888/1162), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/12/3728, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100066005514.0x000059> [accessed 20 October 2019]

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