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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎16v] (37/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Persian Government bad objected to tbe residence of a British Consular officer
at Bampur, and a post at Bam bad, therefore, been substituted. Lastly, a re
presentative was sent to guard tbe interests of British trade at Kob-i-Malik-Siab.
At Meshed tbe Consular establishment was further supplemented by tbe
appointment of a Military Attache for tbe purpose of organising tbe system
of intelligence regarding movements of Bussian troops in Central Asia.
Pinally, it was proposed that, as a complement to tbe measures taken in other
parts of Persia, an Indian officer should be deputed to work in tbe British
Legation at Tehran itself. The plan was one which had been advocated by the
Governments of Lord Northbrook and Lord Lytton. The proposals then made
proved abortive. Later, in 1899, an Indian officer had been appointed to
be Military Attache, and had combined with the functions of that office the
Proposal to appoint an Indian officer duties of Oriental Secretary. But in
at Tehran. 1901 this arrangement had Veased, and
though an Indian officer still held the post of Military Attache at Tehran, his
duties were in no way political. Recent rearrangements had resulted in a
large preponderance of Indian officers in Persia; the Indian Government was
now required to meet the charge for half the total British expenditure in the
country ; the Indian frontier was now conterminous with that of Persia for
several hundreds of miles; and Indian interests had largely increased in every
part of the Shah’s dominions. Lord Curzon urged that the time had come to
reconsider the existing arrangements at Tehran, and he proposed that an
officer should be deputed from India to Tehran, where he would hold
the status of a Secretary of Legation, and, working under the orders of the
Minister, would specially advise in all matters of Indian interest.
The selection of competent officers to fill the new posts was not always an
easy matter. The stations in Persia to which officers of the Indian Political
Department had previously been posted had been few in number. No special
arrangements existed for the training of junior officers for work in Persia, and
but few had the requisite language qualifications, the diplomatic experience,
or the knowledge of commercial requirements. Various schemes were*
suggested with a view to placing matters on a better footing. A plan
Steps to improve the personnel. " hicI ,‘ seriously considered and which
was laid before tlie Secretary of State
proposed that a special Consular Service should be instituted for Persia,
Mesopotamia, the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and Oman. It was held, however, that a
service as small as this would necessarily be, would not offer sufficient induce
ments to competent officers; and it w t ;is finally decided that appointments
in Persia should in future be divided into two classes, viz., those manned
from India, and those filled by the London Foreign Office. The distribution
finally adopted was based on territorial considerations. The posts filled by
the London Foreign Office were, generally speaking, those of North-AVestern
and of Central Persia, and these were to be manned from the Levant Consular
Service, the rules for admission to which were revised in December 1903, and
provided for the regular training of student interpreters for service in Persia
The posts reserved fer the Indian Political Department were mninlv in the
neighbourhood of the Afghan frontier, in the south of Persia, and on the shores
of the Gulf. Endeavours were made in various ways to secure a supplv of
qualified candidates for the Indian posts. The regulations for examination in
Persian and Arabic uere revised with a view to ensuring that the prescribed
tests should be of a more practical nature than those previously in force, and
to encouiaging officers to learn the language of Persia as it is spoken in the
country, and not as it is used in India. Special allowances were sanctioned for
officers qualified in European or Oriental languages which were likely to be of
service, and special attention was paid to linguistic proficiency in selecting
candidates for political employ. The experiment was adopted of deputing
young officers of the Indian Army to visit Persia for fixed periods. One office?
was sent under this arrangement to Seistan and another to Shiraz where he
resided for a term of some months. But the plan was attended with but small
success, and was abandoned in favour of a more satisfactory expedient Addi-
tiona! appointments were sanctioned—first at Nasratabad and later at Bushire—
to be held by junior officers of the Political Department selected as likely

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

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English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎16v] (37/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000026> [accessed 19 August 2019]

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