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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎28v] (61/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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bv tlie “ Vicdomosti.” Hero an attempt was made in February 1900 to estab-
lilh a Russian coal depdt on shore by the landing of an artificially arranged
surplus of coal from the Russian gunboat Gilyak ; the 1 ersian Deputy
Governor, however, encouraged possibly by the presence of H. M. S ‘ Pomone
which had been sent to shadow the “ Gilyak ", refused to permit the opera
tion The coal was accordingly transferred to native boats and was afterwards
deposited in a Persian Government building where it has since remained. Sub.
sequentlv to this incident visits were paid to Bunder Abbas by various Russian
officials, but direct action was not again attempted. There is reason to think
that after 1900 the eve of Russia was fixed not on Bunder Abbas but on
Ohahbar a port of Persian Mekran, which was the principal objective of a
Russian railway survey of Southern Persia carried out in 1900. Though Koweit,
Bunder Abbas and Chakbar were each in succession the pivot of Russian
policy in the Gulf, some interest was also shown by Russian officials and
travellers in Persian Arabistan, Oman, Bahrein and even Central Arabia;
but it does not appear that the designs of Russia in those countries were
serious unless possibly in Arabistan where it is believed that strong efforts
were made by the Russians in 1900-02 to obtain control of the Mohammerah
customs.
Clearer evidence of tlic general intentions of Russia, was nfforded by tli6
Russian railway survey of 1900 to which
Russian railway survey. reference has just been made, This
survey was carried out by a mission which assembled at Tehran and in the
course of three months reconnoitred four dillerent routes irona Isfahan to the
sea, terminating respectively at Mohammorah, Rushire, Runder Abbas and
Chahbar. The° leader of the Chahbar party was Captain Rittich of the
Russian General Staff, a well known authority in Russia on the subject of rail
ways in Persia ; and the result of tho labours of the mission was
the development of a scheme, admirably conceived in its political
and strategical bearings, for the construction of a Russian railway from
Resht by Tehran and Isfahan to Kerman and Bampur and thence to Chahbar
bay.
The indirect means used by Russia to improve her position in the Gulf
indirect establishment of Bnssian in- next claim attention ; they consisted prin-
fluence- cipally in naval demonstrations, in an
increase of the Russian consular staff, and in the subsidising of Russian com
merce.
The first Russian ship of war sent to the Gulf in pursuance of political
aims was the “ Gilyak ”, whose proeeed-
Visita Of Russian war-vessels. ings at Bunder Abbas have already been
noted. The “ Gilyak ” continued her cruise to Bushire and tlience to Basrah,
where her arrival was made the occasion of a great official display by the
B,ussian consular authorities; from Basrah she returned down the Gulf, calling
at Koweit and Bushire. The second demonstration was made in 1901 by the
Russian cruiser “ Yaryag ” which visited Maskat and Bushire and returned
southwards by Lingah and Bunder Abbas. The Russian flag was shown in the
Gulf for the third time by the cruiser “ Askold ” whose formidable aspect made a
serious impression at the ports where she called, including Maskat, Koweit,
Lingah and Bunder Abbas. A fourth tour was made by the Russian cruiser
“ Boyarin ” in company with the Trench war vessel “ Internet ” ; these ships
visited Maskat, Bushire, Koweit and Lingah together, and the cruise was evi
dently intended as an illustration of united action. Excessive pomp and
ceremony characterised the proceedings of all these vessels while in Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
waters.
In 1897 a Russian Consulate-General had berm established at Isfahan for
..... , purely political purposes not unconnected
Russian consular establishments. tvith the affairs of the Gulf, and in tl.e
same year a specially selected officer was appointed to the Russian Consulate-
General at Baghdad from similar motives. These arrangements were supple
mented by the creation in 1899 of a Russian Consulate at Basrah, in 1901 of a
Bussian Consulate-General at Bushire which was provided with a guard of
Rmssian Cossacks, and in 1902 of a Russian Consular Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in Arabistan. In
1897 two Russian doctors had been sent “ to study plague ” at Bushire, and
since then one or more medical representatives of Russia have resided continu
ously at that place.

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎28v] (61/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x00003e> [accessed 23 August 2019]

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