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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎45v] (95/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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At the end of 1903 the Sheikh complained that the Persian Government
were infrin^in" the rights which had been guaranteed to him by the agreement
of the previous 0 year ; but the infractions were probably trivial or were soon
discontinued, for after obtaining the British Minister s advice the Sheikh did
not revert to the subject. In September 1904, Sheikh Khazal took alarm at
the proceedings of the Persian vessels “ Muzaffari ” and “ Persepolls,’ , which
without his consent had visited his territorial waters and made seizures of arms
and ammunition carried by native boats : this he regarded as an encroachment
by the customs authorities upon his executive powers. Representations were
made in his favour by the British Embassy at Tehran, but the Persian Govern
ment declined to view the case in the light desired or to undertake that the
procedure complained of would not be repeated. In all but customs matters,
however, the Sheikh’s authority was still virtually unimpaired at the close of
Lord Curzon’s viceroyalty.
The remainder of the history of Arabistan from 1899 to 1905 either relates
to internal disorders in the north of the province, and to tiionl episodes there
and elsewhere, or is concerned with official changes and commercial enterprises
of which the most important have been mentioned already in connection with
British policy.
Despite the great extent of the Persian coast between Arabistan and
. Persian Mekran, it has furnished few
Coast of Fars, Gulf Ports and isian s. incidents of political importance during
the last seven years except such as have, for the most part, already been dis
posed of in connection with British naval, sanitary or general policy. n
March 1899 the Arab Sheikh or Zahit of Lingah, who in 1898 had vindicated his
hereditary claims to the place by seizing it and putting an end to the direct Per
sian administration which had existed there since 1887, was expelled by the
Persian Government. The operation was carried out, partly by force and
partly by fraud, by the Darya Begi, Governor of the Gulf Ports, in violation
of a pledge which he had given to the commander of H.M.S. “ Pigeon,” de
tailed to watch his movements, that violence would not be resorted to without
previous warning to the British naval authorities ; there was however little
loss of life even among the combatants and not very much damage was done to
the property of British subjects and other neutrals. Eor some time afterwards
the Persians were haunted by the fear of an Arab attack on Lingah from the
opposite side of the Gulf, and to neutralise this danger the Darya Begi, as we
have already seen, engaged in 1900 in a futile and short-lived intrigue with the
Sheikh of Abu Dhabi. In 1902 one of the adherents of the expelled Sheikh,
coming by sea from El Katr, made a small but partially successful raid in
Lingah territory.
The disturbed condition of the Tangistan district, apparently chronic but
more acute at some times than at others, has always been a matter of interest
to the British Government inasmuch as it endangers the security of the Bushire
peninsula and town, and during the period under consideration it twice came
prominently to notice. The first occasion was in 1900 when on a night in
August a Tangistani gang fired a number of shots into the garden of the
British Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at Sahzabad, several of which struck the buildings and one
of which killed a horse belonging to the Resident’s escort. The Persian Gov
ernment, on a demand for satisfaction being addressed to them, despatched a
military expedition into Tangistan under the Darya Begi; a good deal of des
truction was done to the property of the inhabitants, but the Persian force was
not successful in capturing either the rival chiefs to whose misdeeds and
rivalries the unsettled state of the district was due. At the request of the
British Legation the Nizam-ut-Tujjar, a man of influential connections who
was suspected of having instigated the demonstration at Sabzabad in order to
discredit the Darya Begi, was at this time removed from Bushire. In 1903
trouble was renewed in Tangistan, and one of the contending chiefs was invited
to Bushire and there treacherously arrested by the Persian authorities; some
life was lost in a struggle in the town which took place in consequence of his
arrest.

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎45v] (95/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000060> [accessed 20 August 2019]

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