Skip to item: of 386
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎50v] (105/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

2
since Persia had been drawn into the vortex of European politics. Foreign repre
sentation at Tehran was not confined to the conterminous Powers, Great Britain,
Russia and Turkey. France and Germany, America and Austria, Belgium and
Italy and the Scandinavian Kingdoms, all maintained at the Persian capital
considerable diplomatic establishments, necessitated not by contiguity of ter
ritorial possessions, nor by the extent of their commercial stake but by the fact
that Persian affairs had secured a definite place on the stage of world politics.
Equally was Persia in its strategical aspect, not only an Indian hut an Imperial
concern since the boundaries of Afghanistan, guaranteed by Great Britain,
marched for many hundreds of miles with Persia, since Persian territory is con
terminous with Baluchistan, and the evergrowing power of the Kussmn Empire
was already pressing upon Persia. The telegraphic interests of Great Britain
in Persia were evenly divided between the mother-country and India, the line
from Tehran to the North-West Frontier being in the hands of a London com
pany while from Tehran onwards to the Gulf the undertaking was conducted by
an establishment recruited and paid for by the Government of India, although
30 per cent, of the total traffic consisted of messages between Great Britain and
the colonies beyond India. 5 " The position was thus established that Persia was
emphatically an Imperial interest of Great Britain, and that the latter should be
prepared to exert her full strength for the defence of that interest, There was
no desire to add to the political or territorial responsibilities of India or to disturb
the status quo in Persia ; for the present, our object was merely to secure the
interests already built up. .
6. The despatch then proceeded to draw a picture of the present state of
British interests and to examine the dangers by which they were threatened. It
pointed out that the political destinies of a country and a Government as
weak as Persia were likely to he determined by her geographical position in
relation to her neighbours, and that while there w r as a curious correspondence,
there were also notable differences between the positions of Russia and Great
Britain vis-a-vis wiih Persia, which must give Russia in the north a power of
persuasion and menace greater than that possessed by Great Rritain in the
south. It was not surprising, therefore, that the supremacy of Russia in the
north should he increasing, and it followed that though we should try to preserve
what remained of our trade in Northern Persia and to assert British influence
in Tehran as much as possible, our energies would be best directed to the
preservation and consolidation of our interests in the centre and south. Adopt
ing a line drawn across Persia from Khanikin on the Turkish frontier on the
west, through Kermanshah, Ilamadan, Ispahan, Yezd and Kerman to Seistan
and the Afghan frontier on the east, as indicating approximately the existing
line of partition between the British and Russian spheres of influence, both poli
tical and commercial, in Persia, the despatch went on to touch on the various
sub-areas composing the British sphere. For Kermanshah the substitution of a
British Vice-Consul for the existing Native Agent Non-British agents affiliated with the British Government. , as proposed by Sir M. Durand,
was recommended on account of the importance of fostering the Baghdad trade
route via Kermanshah to Tehran, and the suggestion of a Consulate on the
Karim was supported with the object of strengthening our influence with
the Arab, Bakhtiari and Lur tribes. Passing eastwards to Ispahan, agreement
was expressed with Sir ]M. Durand’s proposal to raise the British Consul in
rank and pay to the level of the Russian representative, and the opinion was
strongly held that in any partition of spheres of influence, Ispahan, the old
capital and focus of Persian nationality, must he included in the British zone.
The question of Consular representatives at Yezd, Kerman and Bampur and the
substitution of the Native Agent Non-British agents affiliated with the British Government. at Shiraz by a British officer was then
touched upon, and after a passing reference to Seistan,f which was dealt
with in a separate Minute by Lord Curzon, as of great strategic importance
by reason of its geographical position in relation both to Northern Khorasan,
Western Afghanistan, British Baluchistan and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the despatch
dealt with the tie facto and the de jure position in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and
the recent deliberate consolidation of our influence at Koweit, Bahrein and
Maskat. •
• The line from Tehran to Meshed is aUo under the manasroment of the Indo-European Telegraph Depart men ,
which iu Mav completed the alternative trunk-line from Tehran, via ITezd, Kerman and Lam, to the L.ruiu
frontier, referred to below—pages 78-bO.
fThis is dealt with in the Seistan summary - Chapter XIV, pages 89 92.

About this item

Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎50v] (105/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x00006a> [accessed 22 August 2019]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x00006a">'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [&lrm;50v] (105/386)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x00006a">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000001491.0x000066/Mss Eur F111_534_0105.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000001491.0x000066/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image