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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎57r] (118/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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15
territory in Burma, we encounter the rival ambitions and expanding influence of France
whose aspirations do not fall short of the complete absorption of the kingdom of Siam. It is
far from improbable that within twenty, perhaps within twelve, years from the present
time, the metaphor employed will have been justified, and the Indian .Umpire, along the
complete length of its land frontiers, will be coterminous with the territories, and confronted
with the ambitions of Powers whose interests are on the whole inimical to its own. In such
a case and it is no idle dream of fancy, as the future will show, we shall not be able to move,
to strike, to advance in any part of the world where French or Russian interests are involved,
because of the menace that will stand perpetually at our Indian doors. Of the strain upon
Indian finances, I do not at present speak : but it would be altogether in excess of our means.
In this ring fence there are at present three gaps : the still independent kingdom of Siam
on the east, the portion of whose territories lying nearest to the Indian frontier has been
guaranteed by a convention between Great Britain and France; on the north the upland wilds
of Tibet as yet impervious to alien intrusion ; and on the wesi the dominions of the Shah.
These are the sole remaining buffers that separate the Asiatic possessions of Great Britain
from her European rivals. It rests with British statesmanship to retain all three intact. But
it will sacrifice the most important of their number if it knowingly concedes t) Russia that
gratification of her ambition in Eastern Persia, the consequences of which to the British
Empire it has been the object of this Minute to expose.
31. The events of 1901, during which the views of His Excellency the
Viceroy were thus brought prominently to
Lord Lansdowne’s recapitulation of the notice of His Majesty’s Government,
British policy towards Persia. Jcd ^ Mar(luis of Lansdmvne on Cth JanU-
ary 1902 to address to the Persian Government a weighty and comprehensive
pronouncement, modelled on a draft submitted by His Excellency, explaining
the policy of His Majesty’s Government in regard to the various questions
pending between Persia and Great Britain. A copy of this communication was
forwarded by the Secretary of State for India to the Government of India with his
replv (dated 14th March 1902) to their despatch of 7th November 1901, as indicat
ing the position taken up by His Majesty’s Government. Lord Lansdowne’s
despatch, after referring to the difficulty which would he experienced in
maintaining the former policy of preserving the independence and sovereignty of
the Shah in face of the danger of Persia falling under the complete domination
of another Power, went on to recognise the superior interest of Bussia in the
northern portion of the Shah’s dominions ; but with regard to the south,
where the efforts of a century had built up for us a pre-eminent mercantile posi
tion, the following remarks were made: “ It cannot reasonably be supposed that
Great Britain would abandon a position attained by so many years ot constant
eTort, or would acquiesce in the attempts on the part of other Powers to acquire
political predominance in the south of Persia. Although, therefore, His Majesty's
Government have no desire to obstruct in any way the efforts of Bussia to
iind a commercial entrance for her trade in the Persian Gull, or to oppose an
obstacle to the passage of her commerce from the north for export from Persian
ports they could not admit that such oommereial facilities should form the
pretext for the occupation by Bussia of points possessing strategical importance
or for the establishment of such ascendency in the south as she already enjoys
in the north. The Persian Government should, therefore, distinctly understand
and bear in mind that Great Britain could not consent to the acquisition by
Bussia of a military or naval station in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , for the reason that
such a station must he regarded as a challenge to Great Britain, and a menace
to her Indian Empire. If the Persian Government were at any time to make
such a concession to Bussia, it would be necessary for His Majesty’s Govern
ment to take, in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , such measures as they might consider
necessary for the protection of British interests. Nor, again, could His Majesty’s
Government acquiesce in the concession to Bussia of any preferential politicpl
rights or advantages, or any commercial monopoly or exclusive privilege in
the southern or south-eastern districts of Persia, including Seistan.” The
despatch went on to recall the promises given by the Persian Government
not to place the customs of Southern Persia under foreign control. Beference
was next made to the written promise given by the late Shah and confirmed
by his successor with regard to British rights, whenever railways are construct
ed in the south of Persia, and the recent
* ride paragraph 31«»/., P «ge 9. declaration, in July* 1901, of His Majesty's
Government of the importance which they attach to Seistan remaining free
from the intrusion of foreign authority in any shape, was reoalled.

About this item

Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎57r] (118/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000077> [accessed 23 August 2019]

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