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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎84r] (172/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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68
towns and because recent occurrences in Seistan made the Government of India
distrust the attitude of the Persian Government towards the new trade route.
They also thought that the Persian official appointed might be taken into Rus
sian pay and thus be more likely to hinder than encourage trade. It was urged
on behalf of our Agent at Bampur that he had no Consular powers and
was little more than a news agent but the Persian Government continued
obdurate and as they appeared to possess, under the Treaty of 1857 between
Withdrawal of the British Agent from Great Britain and Persia, a strong claim
Bampur. to reciprocal treatment, it was decid
ed to refuse to recognise a Persian Consul in British Baluchistan and
to drop the proposal for a British Agent at Bampur. Sir A. Hardinge
was instructed to inform the Persian Government that, out of deference
to the personal feelings of the Shah, His Majesty’s Government had
decided for the present not to press their treaty rights in this matter. The
Agent was withdrawn to Kerman and employed on survey and other duties
until the autumn of 1903 when Major Sykes, His Majesty’s Consul, Kerman,
pointed out the highly commercial position of Bam, and the immense importance
which it would acquire when the Central Persian Telegraph line, then (October
1903) within measurable distance of that town, would reach it. The question
Appointment of a Native Agent Non-British agents affiliated with the British Government. at was discussed by .Lord Curzon with Sir
Bam. - A. Hardinge during the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. tour
and it was decided to send on the late British Agent at Bampur from Kerman
to Bam where he took up his duties in the summer of 1904
8. The proposal to appoint Consular Officers to Ahwaz and Kermanshah
^ , „ originally made* in the despatch of 1899
* r»(it Chapter 1. paragraph 25, page 6. ° ^ cir\rt • „ „
0 0 was pursued in 1903 in consequence ot
Appointment of a British Consular recentlv received information of Russian
Officer at Ahwaz and Kermanshah. „ i *
activity in the Karun region and ot
attempts to win over the Bakhtinri Chiefs. But before these arrangements
could be made Mr. McDouall, Vice-Consul at Mohammerah, applied for 8
months leave in Pebruary ]903. It was considered inadvisable to leave the
post vacant or in the hands of the Assistant Surgeon, as proposed by the
Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , as the arrival of a Russian Consul was reported to be then
imminent; and the Viceroy suggested that Major Burton, an otficer who had
previously travelled in the Lur and Bakhtiari country, should be appointed to
act for Mr. McDouall with a view to entering into relations with those chiefs.
The duties of the Vice-Consul at Mohammerah were mainly commer
cial but factors were developing in Arabistan which, during Major Burton’s
tenure, shifted the centre of his duties from Mohammerah to Ahwaz and the
necessity of securing an officer combining military and political experience to
succeed Major Burton and to be stationed at Ahwaz became apparent. The
Government of India decided to create a separate Vice-Consulate at Ahwaz and
in the spring of 1901 Lieutenant Lorimer who had been working some time
among the Indian frontier tribes was appointed to that port. He was informed
that it was his duty to enter into friendly relations with the tribes and to afford
protection and assistance to the enterprise of the newly formed British Company
known as the “ Persian Transport Company ” who were in receipt of a Govern
ment subsidy of £2,000 per annum for ten years for exploiting the Ahwaz-
Tehran road concession and who had experienced difficulties owing to the
f Vide Chapter XIII, paragraph 10, page 84. lawlcSSnCSSf of the COUntry.
9. At the same time a Vice-Consul (Captain Gough) was sent to Kermanshah
with a view to his co-operating from the north in the task in which
the Vice-Consul, Ahwaz, was engaged in the south. Moreover it was thought
that the appointment would serve as a reply to the Russian Government who had
Appointment of a British Consular recently posted a Consul to Kermanshah.
officer at Kermaushah. and were endeavouring to capture the
trade—mainly British—passing by the route from Baghdad to Tehran. The
Vice-Consulate was raised to the status of a Consulate in 1901 in consequence ot
similar promotion having been received by the Russian Vice-Consul.
10. As further evidence of British interest in Arabistan may be cited
the appointment of a Consular Surgeon for Arabistan and Kerman-
C311FD

About this item

Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎84r] (172/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x0000ad> [accessed 22 September 2019]

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