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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎102r] (208/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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99 '
the diplomatic struggle, daily became more acute, with a trained diplo
matist like M. Miller, who had the assistance of his brother, Dr. Miller, in the
Russian Consulate, to free his hands for the prosecution of intrigues, which
embraced not only Seistan itself, but the Sarhad, our frontier, the trade ioute, and
Afghan territory. The amount of local work which devolved on the Vice-
Consul made it abundantly clear that he was at a disadvantage single handed
to check the ubiquitous schemes of M. Miller and assistance was imperative to
safeguard British interests adequately. Accordingly m June 1902, Captain
V A Plunkett, of the Lincolnshire Regiment, was deputed to Seistan for eight
months to assist Major Penn, who in the following August was promoted to be
Consul on Lord Curzon’s recommendation, M. Miller having received the same
advancement and the decoration of St. Anne at the hands of the Riissi|in Go -
eminent in the previous May. On the termmation of Captain Plunkett s
deputation the need for additional permanent assistance to the Consul efficiently
to meet his extended responsibilities and the growing importance of Ins charge
continued and in February 1901 Lieutenant Keyes was deputed to Seistan as
Assistant to the Consul who had ^^e^fub^ma
inde*penden?charge. c " ted aS an discussion with Sir A. Hardinge during the
Gulf tour, the Consulate was constituted as an independent charge enabling the
British Consul to correspond direct with the Minister as did the Russian
Consul with his VI inister. Later it was also proposed to attach a medical officer
to the Consulate, but this was not carried out during Lord Curzon s Viceroyalty.
19 M Miller continued his determined attempt to set forth the superiority
of Russian over British influence in
Political change in Seistan ; its cause. S e j s tan when in July 1902 he posed as the
political adviser of the Local Government and the protector of the people in the
Seistan- Afghan water dispute. Indeed within the last two years 6wmg to his
efforts the situation in Seistan had changed considerably. At the beginning o.
1901 there were neither Persian Foreign Office Agents, Belgian olheta s, nor
military officers, and Seis.an still enjoyed its primitive sunplicity and imiteJ
autonomy. Since then the Saistam Muza, a ho fanned the Customs, had gn
place to the Belgian Director, the Governor’s Secretary had been supplanted
by a Foreign Office Agent from Resbt, and the charge of the troops bad been
transferred to the Yamin-i Nizam, or representative of the Persian \\ ar Office
who was entirely and actively pro-Itussian in his sympathies, ^d looked to the
sunnoTof the ‘ Russians in Seistan and Tehran to oust the Hashmat-ul-Mulk
and secure the Governorship of Seistan for himself. The Hashmat s position was
difficult and insecure, as he had now the staff of Tehran-appointed officials
to anpease as well as the Governor-General of Meshed, and however
friendly his real sentiments towards the British might be, he ^s frequently
compelled to act in opposition to their interests. In dealing with
Russian activity in Seistan, some account will be given of M. Miller an
ffis extended intrigues. Trained in the St. Petersburg Foreign Office, and
a perfect linguist, his policy had been one of y ,^ 1 of P n e f, an
intimidation both as regards the Local Government and the staff of Bel la
Customs officials who, under his guidance, proved ready tools for mjtumg
British interests in the trade route—seriously menaced _ by the new Pers
Customs Tariff—and for pushing Russian political aims in. the direction of
the Zso Ba uch frontier and" the South. The great political change there
fore which had taken place in Seistan by May 1903, when Mr. Dobbs relieved
Major Bonn who proceeded on leave, was very far from being a satisfactory one,
hut 3 British influence and prestige received a valuable access of strength
the presence of the McMahon Mission in Seistan.
20 The possession of Seistan remained up to the middle of
* F a bone of contention between Persia
The Seistan Boundary commission. an( ^ Afghanistan, and as recently as
1872 the line between the two countries was laid down by Sir P. Goldsmid,
acting as arbitrator under the Treaty of Paris of 1857. Under hia arbitral award
the Perso-Afghan frontier was drawn from the North-Eastern hounda^ of the
Persian district of Neh-Bandan along the southern fringe of the Naizar to the

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎102r] (208/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000009> [accessed 19 August 2019]

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<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000009">'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [&lrm;102r] (208/386)</a>
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