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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎134r] (272/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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just described must, lie thought, he modified because of his inability to trace
among the records in the Tehran Legation the original Persian of the Shah’s
authorisation of 1S68, a copy of which was forwarded to your predecessor with
our Secret despatch No. 56 (External) of 7th May 1903. We do not appreciate
the force of this, argument. The absence or the loss of the Persian original
cannot possibly alter the facts that the concession was granted; that it was
acted upon for 12 years ; and that incontestable traces of occupation still
survive on the spot. It appears to us, therefore, to he open to His Majesty’s
Government to adopt whichever method of procedure they may prefer.
11 . The choice may be expected in part to turn upon the present attitude
of the Persian Government and the policy that it is desired to pursue towards
them. The experience of His Excellency the Viceroy during his recent
visit to Bushire, the subsequent behaviour of the Persian Government with
regard to that incident, and the general tone of unfriendliness that has
characterised their recent communications, undoubtedly justify the adoption of a
firm attitude, and will probably not have predisposed His Majesty’s Govern
ment to any unnecessary display of courtesy. In these circumstances, it
may be thought desirable'to act upon Sir. A. Hardinge’s advice, and to restore
the telegraph station without more ado. We should be grateful for early
instructions on the subject, in order that the cable may be laid and the
necessary buildings re-erected during the present cool season. Failing the
adoption of this plan, we think that the second alternative would bo preferable
to the first, although it is to be feared, as anticipated by Sir A. Hardinge in
his letter to the Marquess of Lansdowne of 27th June 1903, that any procedure
that might open the door for discussion or protest, could not fail to be attended
by considerable delay.
12. In either case the Persian Government might be conciliated by the
proposal to carry on the telegraph wire either by land or by sea from Henjam
to Bunder Abbas. When the Viceroy was at the latter place, he was earnestly
pressed both by the local traders and also by the Salar-i-Moazzam, Governor of
the Gulf Ports, to lend his assistance to the connection of Bunder Abbas
by telegraph with the outer world ; and it is scarcely credible that the Persian
Government, unless they mean to be deliberately unpleasant, should not
welcome an extension which will be both of political and of commercial
advantage to them. Should they do so, they might opportunely be reminded
that, under the Convention of 2nd April! 868, we possess the right to continue
our land line from Jask to some point between that place and Bunder Abbas,
a phrase which might be interpreted as applicable to any spot short of Bunder
Abbas itself, such as the British Consulate at Naband, four miles on the Jask
side of the town.
13. In the event of His Majesty’s Government accepting our proposals for
the immediate re-institution of a cable station at Henjam, we trust that they
will, upon reconsideration, consent to bear at least one half of the cost of the
arrangements as requested in our Secret despatch iso. 56 (External), dated the
7th May 1903. The telegraph is asked for in the main in the interests of the
naval squadron which is maintained in the Persian Gull by His Majesty s
Government : and also on political grounds, which are divided in even propor
tions between ihe Imperial Government and the Government of India. Ihe
larger part of the expenditure on the shores of the Gull is already borne by
Indian revenues : and it does not seem fair that any fresh measures that may be
required to sustain our influence on the sea—the charge of which has hitherto
been assumed by the Home Government (with substantial contributions fiom
ourselves) should be debited exclusively to Indian funds.
11. We have now detailed at some length the proposals which we recom
mend for the protection of our paramount naval, strategical, and political
interests in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . It seems to us most desirable that the oppor
tunity of acting while action is still easy, and before we can be forestalled,
should not be sacrificed : and we trust to receive early permission (in the case
of Henjam, which has already been accepted in principle, if possible by tele
graph) to proceed in the manner described.

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

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English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎134r] (272/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000049> [accessed 26 August 2019]

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