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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎139v] (283/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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20
the duties at present carried out by the subsidised skips of Ilis Majesty s Navy;
and thirdly as an integral part of the scheme, the transfer to, and incorporation
in, the Royal Indian Marine of H. M. ships Sphinx, Lapwing and Redbreast.
4. We are, however, left in some doubt regarding the exact scope of the
proposals. Regarding the consideration, in respect of which the subsidy is paid
for the services of the ships of the Royal Navy, the Admiralty^ first speak of
their employment “for Indian purposes in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. a sphere of
comparatively restricted duties. The subsequent suggestion that the duties at
present carried out “ in Indian waters ” by these ships should, in future, devolve
upon the vessels of the Royal Indian Marine is, however, a matter of much
wider import.
5. The present agreement in respect of the subsidy is based on the decision
given in 1895 by Lord Rosebery as arbitrator between the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. and the
Admiralty. By the terms of that judgment, the subsidy paid by India is a
contribution towards the upkeep of the entire East Indies Squadron which is
entrusted with the general and effective defence of Indian shores and the pro
tection of Indian trade, and not only towards the cost of the ships employed in
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and adjacent waters. Accordingly, any scheme which, in the
words of your despatch, relates to “ the performance of the duties hitherto carried
on by the ships of the East Indies Squadron subsidised by India ,, must to some
extent involve a reversion to the former policy of maintaining a local naval
combatant force—in other words, the reconstitution of an Indian Navy. We
have therefore considered the proposal both in its narrower and wider scope.
6. We would preface our remarks by stating that we desire no change in
the present system under which the naval duties in Indian waters are carried out.
We have no*reason to complain of the way in which wo have been served by the
Roval Navy in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. or elsewhere, nor of any lack of control in the
application of their services wherever they have been required. On the con
trary, we are wholly satisfied with the manner in which His Majesty’s Navy
has co-operated in the enterprises entrusted to it.
7. The single modification which we have consistently desired to make in
the existing naval arrangements has been the grant to us of the authority to arm
certain Royal Indian Marine vessels as auxiliaries to the ships of the Royal
Navy for specific purposes in time of peace, a measure which would give us the
means of expanding largely the naval force at our disposal at short notice, and
at small expense. Representations on the subject were made in 1885, and in
1892, in connection with the construction of new Indian Marino vessels design
ed for service on the Persian and Arabian coasts. A similar question arose, on
two occasions, regarding the retention of armament on the Lawrence, and it
was in relation to the arming of this ship for the suppression of the illicit traffic
in arms that we addressed you in 1902. Our former proposals were negatived
in consequence of the opinion expressed by the Admiralty that no sea-going
vessel belonging to the State should be in commission unless under their control.
In reply to our last reference, we were informed that legislation would be
necessary to enable the Royal Indian Marine vessels to be placed at the disposal
of the Admiralty from time to time for duties other than those whicli come
within the scope of the Indian Marine Service Act of 1884; and that, in exist
ing circumstances, these vessels could ordinarily be armed only in the event of
war with a foreign Power.
8. The Admiralty now consider that the difficulties which exist in connec*
tion with the incorporation of armed ships in the Royal Indian Marine are not
insuperable. It seems that they have also abandoned their objection to the
existence of vessels of this class which would not be under their control. Two
alternative methods of fulfilling our naval requirements therefore lie before
us:—
(i) the system suggested by the Admiralty, which involves the constb
tution of an armed squadron of the Royal Indian Marine under
the complete control of the Government of India, and under the
executive command of one of their officers except in time of war.
This measure would necessarily entail a diminution of the subsidy
paid by India,

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

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English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎139v] (283/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000054> [accessed 23 August 2019]

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<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000054">'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [&lrm;139v] (283/386)</a>
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