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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎145v] (295/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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32
I have still one agreeable function to perform. Only yesterday I received
the gracious permission of His Majesty the King-Emperor to confer upon Your
Highness the high honour of the Grand Cross of the Order of the Indian Em
pire. This distinction will be a proof to Your Highness of the sincere senti
ments of friendship which are entertained towards you by the British Govern
ment ; and it is also a recognition of the loyalty to which Your Highness has
given such fervent expression on more than one occasion in the course of yester
day and to-day. It will now be my pleasing duty, as Grand Master of the
OMer, to proceed to the due and solemn investiture of Your Highness.
Enclosure III to 15.
Address by His Excellency the Viceroy at a Public Durbar held oh board
H. M. S. “Argonaut” on the 21st November 1903, at Shargah for the
Arab Chiefs of the littoral.
Chiefs of the Arab Coast who are in Treaty relations with the British
Government, —I have come here as the representative in the great Empire of
India of the British authority which you and your fathers and fore-fathers have
known and dealt with for more than a hundred years; and my object is to show
you, that though you live at some distance from the shores of India, you are
not forgotten by the Government, but that they adhere to the policy of guardian
ship and protection which has given you peace and guaranteed your rights for
the best part of a century; and that the first Viceroy of India who has ever
visited these waters does not quit them without seeking the opportunity of
meeting you in person and of renewing the assurances and engagements by
which we have been so long united.
Chiefs, your fathers and grandfathers before you have doubtless told you of
the history of the past. You know that a hundred years ago there were constant
trouble and fighting in the Gulf; almost every man was a marauder or a
pirate; kidnapping and slave-trading flourished; lighting and bloodshed went
on without stint or respite; no ship could put out to sea without fear of attack ;
the pearl fishery was a scene of annual conflict; and security of trade or peace
there was none. Then it was that the British Government intervened and said
that, in the interests of its own subjects and traders, and of its legitimate influence
in the seas that wash the Indian coasts, this state of affairs must not continue.
British flotillas appeared in these waters. British forces occupied the ports and
towns on the coast that we see from this deck. The struggle w-as severe
while it lasted but it was not long sustained. In 1820 the first general Treaty
was signed between the British Government and .the Chiefs; and of these or
similar agreements there have been in all no fewer than eight. In 1839 the
Maritime Truce was concluded, and was renewed from time to time until
the year 1853, when it was succeeded by the Treaty of Perpetual Peace that has
lasted ever since. Under that Treaty it was provided that there should be a com
plete cessation of hostilities at sea between the subjects of the signatory Chiefs,
and a “ perfect maritime truce”—to use the words that were employed—“ for
evermore ; that in the event of aggressionson anyone by sea, the injured parties
should not retaliate, but should refer the matter to the British Resident in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and that the British Government should watch over the peace
of the Gulf and ensure, at all times, the observance of the Treaty. Chiefs, that
Treaty has not, of course, prevented occasional trouble and conflict; it has some
times been neglected or infringed ; but on the whole it has well deserved its
name ; and under it has grown up a condition of affairs so peaceful and secure
that the oldest among you can only remember as a dim story the events of the
past, while the younger have never seen warfare or bloodshed on the seas. It is
now eleven years since the last disturbance of the peace occurred.
Chiefs, out of the relations that were thus created, and which by your own
consent constituted the British Government the guardian of inter-tribal peace,
there grew up political ties between the Government of India and yourselves,
whereby the British Government became your overlords and protectors, and you
a\e iclations with no other Power. Every one of the State known as the

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎145v] (295/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000060> [accessed 25 August 2019]

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