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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎148r] (300/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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During the time in which I have filled my present office in India I have
done my best to facilitate the progress of trade, and to ensure the adequate
protection of British interests in the Gulf and in the adjoining provinces and
territories. His Majesty’s Government at home have also been warmly
interested in the matter. The result of these efforts has been that we have
gradually developed the Nushki-Seistan trade-route, which is now a recognised
channel of commerce to Eastern Persia. We have appointed a Consul in
Seistan, and are about to extend the telegraph thither. We now have Indian
officers residing as Consul at Kerman, and as Vice-Consul at Bunder Abbas,
where we are about to build a Consular residence; we have connected Maskat
by cable with Jask, and we hope for further telegraphic extensions in the
interests of trade. We have established a Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrein; and we
now have a Consul at Mohammerah and a Vice-Consul at Ahwaz. The Karun
trade-route has made substantial progress, and has been supplemented by the
newly-opened road, with caravanserais and bridges, through the Bakhtiari
country to Ispahan. A British Consul has also been appointed to Shiraz. We
have improved and accelerated the mail service to all the Gulf ports. British
India steamers now call at Koweit as well. During the same period British
medical officers have been lent by us to the Persian Government to conduct
the quarantine arrangements in the Gulf. Simultaneously British interests
have found a most vigilant spokesman at Tehran in His Majesty’s Minister,
Sir Arthur Hardinge, who has been good enough to accompany me throughout
my present journey, and with whom I have enjoyed many opportunities of
discussing the common interests of the Home and Indian Governments in
Persia. I hope that our discussions may be fraught with advantage to the
interests that we jointly represent.
Altogether, Gentlemen, I think it may be said that in Bushire you receive
an amount of attention that is not always extended in similar measure to places
so remote from headquarters, while the fact that a British Resident lives in
your midst and is able personally to look after your concerns, which I am glad
to learn from your address that he does entirely to your satisfaction, is a further
guarantee for their protection. I hope that the position which British interests
thus enjoy, and which is neither artificial in origin nor recent in growth, since
it is the result of nearly a century and a half of patient and laborious effort
both by Government and by private enterprise, may long be maintained, and
that Bushire may continue in the future, as it lias done in the past, to be the
centre from which this benign and peaceful influence radiates throughout
Southern Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
Enclosure VII to 15.
Private interview between His Excellency the Viceroy and &ayad Faisal-bin-
Tnrki, Sultan of Maskat.
While at Maskat on the 19th November 1903, His Excellency the Viceroy
accorded a private interview to His Highness Sayad Eaisal-bin-lurki, Sultan of
Maskat, on board the R.I.M.S. Hardinge at 1- 5 p m. after the Durbar and
Investiture. Colonel Kemball, Resident in the Gulf, Major Cox, 1 olitical
Agent, Maskat, and Mr. Dane, Secretary, Foreign Department, were present.
His Excellency invited the Sultan to state freely and without reserve any
subjects which he desired to bring to notice. The Sultan at first said that he did
not wish to trouble His Excellency about anything. He dll not anticipate
any further trouble about Rostak. Of course he might have again to appeal to His
Excellency for assistance, but he wanted nothing at present. After some
further conversation he said that there were two small points that he would
like to mention. First he hoped that His Excellency would again bring to
notice the case of his cousin Ali-bin-Salim, wdio was presented to His Excellency
at the interview at the Sultan’s Barza (Durbar room) aud who was removed
from Zanzibar for intriguing against the present Sultan in favour ot Sayad
Khalid on the death of Sayad Burghash, He had now been away from las home

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎148r] (300/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000065> [accessed 24 August 2019]

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<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000065">'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [&lrm;148r] (300/386)</a>
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