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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎158r] (320/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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consider that the point is not free from doubt. In regard to the deeper waters,
they are of opinion that there would be no reasonable chanoo of asserting
with success the right of the tribes to debir other nations fro:n dredging.
4. In these circumstances, I agree with the general conclusion at which the
Law OfTicors of the Crown have arrived, viz., that it is not expedient to raise
the question internationally by forcibly preventing vessels of foreign nationali-
ties from fishing on the banks. The object in view may probably be attainable
by indirect methods.
I have the honour to be,
My Lord,
Your Lordship’s most obedient humble Servant,
(Signed) St. John Brodrick.
25
No. 5 (Secret—External), dated Fort William, the 9th January 1902.
From—The Government of India in the Foreign Department,
To—The Right Hon'ble Lord George Francis Hamilton, Her Majesty’s
Secretary of State for India.
With^eferenee to Your Lordship’s Secret despatch No, 24, dated the
2nd August 11)01, we have the honour to forward copies of the further papers
cited in the enclosed list, on the subject of the traffic in arms in the Persian
Gulf.
2. We accept Your Lordship’s opinion that there is no need for any
revision of the Agreement with the Sultan of Maskat in respect of the owner
ship of any arms or ammunition which may be confiscated under the authority
of His Highness within His Highness’s territories or territorial waters. We
have communicated this decision to our Fo itical Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
who will instruct the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Maskat to report from time to time
in wliat manner the Sultan disposes of any arms and ammunition which may
come into his possession in virtue of the Agreement. We understand that
negotiations will now be opened with the Persian Government with a view to
the removal of any misunderstanding which may at present exist as to the
ownership of arms seized in Ma^kat waters on their way to Persian ports;
and we shall doubtless be informed of the result of these negotiations in due
course.
3. Your Lordship invites us to consider whether it would he possible and
expedient to allow small parcels of arms and ammunition for private use,
covered by a permit from the Persian Consulate-General in London, to be
transhipped at a British Indian port for a Persian port. We are disposed to
hold that, since such consignments could be despatched to Persian ports by the
direct route without passing through a Bridsh Indian port in transit, the pro
posed concession may be made without objection. Colonel Kemball confirms
this view, but adds that a certificate granted by the Persian Consul-General in
London cannot cover the import of arms into Persia, for which the special
permission of the Persian Government is required. Subject to this understand
ing, we are prepared, on receipt of instructions from Your Lordship, to exempt
consignments of arms and ammunition, certified in the manner described, from
the operation of our Notification in the Home Department, No. 967, dated the
13th April 1900.
4. The letters enclosed with this despatch indicate that the difficulties in
the way of checking the trade in arms with the tribes on the Arab Coast and
with the smaller Persian ports have not abated in any considerable degree : and
Captain Cox reports that Mods. Goguyer, whose connection with the late
French Consul has been the subject of frequent comment, is now taking an
active and lucrative part in this traffic. It is evident that our ^greemenls
with Persia and Maskat, and the action which we have taken under them,
have not sufficed to place a permanent and effective check upon the How
of arms into the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and we cannot avoid the conviction that
so long as Maskat remains a free port for the import and export of warlike
material, the trade will continue to flourish. The remedy lies, we conceive,

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎158r] (320/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x000079> [accessed 22 August 2019]

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