Skip to item: of 361
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

Coll 30/159 'Ownership of Hawar Islands.' [‎7r] (13/361)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 file (179 folios). It was created in 29 Apr 1936-15 Oct 1942. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

and their residence in Hawar gives Bahrain no greater claim
than they have to Zaknuniyah (see Lorimer page 391 and page
396) and when the Shaikh of Bahrain tried to control them at
Budaiyya they left in a huff*
(h) Shaikh Isa used to pay an annual visit to Kav/ar.
These Shaikhs used to pay an annual visit to Lingeh and still
visit Kasa each year* shaikh Isa also went hawking to
Zaknuniyah.
(c) He helped Turkish soldiers there. Bahrain has
also helped shipwrecked mariners off the Kasa coast.
(d) Disputes in Kav/ar were tried in Bahrain. By agree
ment parties can take their cases to any t^adhi and two Iraqis
on the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. could take a dispute to Eerbala if they
wished. It was only the easy sea journey and the Dowasir
connection that made Bahrain a convenient forum as compared
v/ith a difficult and dangerous land journey to Dohah.
(e) The Shaikh of Bahrain's fidawis were sent to Kav/ar
to arrest people . Bin Jiluwi sent men to Bahrain at least
tv/ice v/hen I v/as there and frequently sent them to % atar.
(f) The subjection of people of Hawar to Bahrain
Rules and Regulations. Bahrain never had any rules and
regulations till it had an adviser, and he has been collecting
evidence of administration in Hawar for many jears past v/ith
the object of making this claim, in which he has been very
successful. Had qatar had a British Adviser this claim could
not have been made, ^.s for the Hawaris’ indignation that any
one should suggest they were not Bahrain subjects, it will be
remembered there is a Bahrain iolice post there *.
5. The view of independent ^.rabs is that Kav/ar belongs
to qatar and I am convinced the decision is inequitable, but
I do not feel that it is practical politics to reverse it
now. I should, however, like the Bahrain and qatar cases to
be placed before Daly, who has an expert knowledge of this

About this item

Content

The file concerns the disputed claims of the rulers of Bahrain and Qatar to sovereignty over the Hawar Islands. The issue arose afresh in 1936 in response to a request from Petroleum Concessions Limited to settle the issue of ownership, in order that the Company could claim oil concession rights over the island as part of the concession not previously allocated to the Bahrain Petroleum Company (BAPCO) (the Bahrain Unallotted Area).

The papers contain statements of evidence on both sides, and correspondence discussing the question from the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain; the Foreign Office; Petroleum Concessions Limited; the Government of Bahrain; and the two rulers concerned. The British Government decided in 1939, after examining the evidence, that the islands belonged to Bahrain (folio 44). The papers show that the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Geoffrey Prior, challenged the validity of this judgement in 1941, stating that the case had been decided 'according to western ideas, and no allowance has been made for local custom and sentiment' (folios 6-8). However, a subsequent letter on the subject from the Government of India to the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. concluded that it was then too late to reverse the decision (folio 4).

The Arabic language content of the papers consists of approximately five folios; these include photographs of judgements (with translation, folios 57-58) submitted by the Government of Bahrain to the British Government, showing that the Bahrain Court had exercised jurisdiction in legal cases concerning residents of Hawar (folios 130-133).

The file also includes photographs of places in Hawar (folios 126-127).

The file includes a divider, which gives a list of correspondence references contained in the file by year. This is placed at the back of the correspondence.

Extent and format
1 file (179 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the file.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the main foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 181; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Two additional foliation sequences are also present in parallel between ff 3-179, and ff 48-88; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

Coll 30/159 'Ownership of Hawar Islands.' [‎7r] (13/361), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/12/3895, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100076666398.0x000010> [accessed 15 November 2019]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100076666398.0x000010">Coll 30/159 'Ownership of Hawar Islands.' [&lrm;7r] (13/361)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100076666398.0x000010">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000648.0x0001d0/IOR_L_PS_12_3895_0016.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000648.0x0001d0/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image