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File 4011/1923 Pt 1 'PERSIAN GULF NEGOTIATIONS 1928-33. BASIDU.' [‎34r] (72/1306)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (649 folios). It was created in 22 Oct 1923-29 Nov 1933. It was written in English, French and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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/
M
-4-
R#siawnoy D*0.
latter of Sept.
Id30 1 to «Ck
Eoftmer Vol.I H J2L
p.390•
Bushire Tel.115of
5 # ^ • 3 ^
In 1930 it was made clear that the Affan*
subordinate to the Consul at Bandar Abbas, hlmaelf
subordinate to the Resident. And even in 1905 the
cost of the Depot was a mere 750 Rs. per annm.
In 1930 the Caretaker Hussain was actua’l
expelled from Basidu on account of Persian ccaolalnta
of his smuggling. *
CONCLUSION•
There is no evidence that any positive
jurisdiction was ever exei'cSsed over the inhabitants
Basidu. If the place is regarded as British Territory
pure and simple then Sa'ld Sidi f s case shows that there
was no local court competent to try the offender and
this is supported by the slave owning case. If the
British Station was not regarded as British Territory
then it is conceivable that the place might htva been
under Consular jurisdiction under Orders*in-Co>
1889-1913. But if such Jurisdiction was in fact
exercised, it would have been so only between the years
183 -1928. In 1928 extra-territorial Jurisdiction was
abolished for Persian Coasts and Islands.
.N LI STM RT FOR D J HCB PURPOSES.
P.0.13 -P.118
para.8.
Lorimer Vol.I
Pt.II.P.2076.
Lorimer Vol.I
Pt.II.P.2108.
P.0.13. P.119,
para. 13.
*T &
j • 1 n• J. , S. I • to
3.w.o.,p.a. of
17.4.13.Ho. 380IV.
There is no record that the inhabitants of
Basidu were ever enlisted for defence purposes#
During the Anglo-Persian War of 1856-7 the
place was freely used by British forces.
The 9 ^Unjab” was stationed there and rt 0onstance M
was employed to patrol the channel between Kisltm Island
and the main land. Two 68pdr« guns and 80 native
marines were landed on 19th December, 1856. Tho General
Officer Commanding the land forces revised this scheme
somewhat and perhaps "Punlab" was withdrawn.
It is not without Interest to note that thou$i
the Military Guard was withdrawn in 1883; though no
reference is made in any work of reference to any re
establishment of a guard, and though it is stated
categorically that no detachment has since been stationed
at Baaidu, yet a guard of th > 2nd Ra|put Reglasnt was in
fact stationed at Baaidu in 1913. (References - copies
of telegrams between Commandor-inChief, East Indies,
and Senior Haval Officer, Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , in connection
with Commander-in-Chief # s letter dat«u 15th January 1913,
NO.15/830IV addressed to Government of India, Which has
reference to leaving, a few tons of coal at Basidu for
political purposes).
This guard was eventually transferred to
HenJam in April, 1913.
Since the guard (a naval guard) was replaced
in 1928 there has been no question of enlisting or
training the local inhabitants.
CONCLUSION

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Content

This volume relates to the British occupation of Basidu, situated on Kishm [Qeshm] Island in the Gulf, close to the south coast of Persia [Iran], and occupied by the British since the early 1820s. It is stated in the correspondence that the site had been used mainly as a coal depot for British naval vessels until 1913, and that since then it has been retained on 'political grounds', as a potential bargaining asset in negotiations with Persia.

The correspondence primarily concerns the British claim (or lack thereof) to Basidu, in the event of the Persian Government questioning Britain's ongoing occupation. It covers the history of Basidu's status and the various existing agreements that relate to it, as part of an attempt by the British to gather documentary evidence to support their claim. Also discussed are a number of reported incidents at Basidu, involving British representatives and the local Persian authorities, mainly regarding customs, taxes, and the presence of the British naval guard. In addition, the correspondence touches on Anglo-Persian relations in general, with occasional references being made to ongoing treaty negotiations between the two countries.

The volume's principal correspondents are as follows: the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; the British Minister in Tehran; the Senior Naval Officer in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; officials of the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , the Foreign Office, the Admiralty, and the Government of India's Foreign and Political Department. Other notable but less frequent correspondents include the following: the Foreign Secretary to the Government of India; the Viceroy of India; the Commander-in-Chief of the East Indies Station; the Law Officers of the Crown.

Included with the correspondence are several related documents, including the following: two sketch maps (f 622); copies (in English and Arabic) of a treaty dated 1856 between Muscat and Persia, in which the Imam of Muscat acknowledges Kishm Island as being part of the Persian Empire (f 179 and ff 221-223); draft and final copies of an India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. memorandum dated 18 October 1933, outlining Britain's understanding of the history of the status of Basidu from 1720 to 1928, including extracts from nineteenth century reports and related correspondence (ff 46-54 and ff 123-159); a submission of reference, prepared by the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. and the Foreign Office, for the Law Officers of the Crown, requesting the latter's legal opinion on the strength of the British claim to Basidu (ff 43-45 and ff 67-83); a copy of a secret report on Basidu, prepared by the Commander-in-Chief at the East Indies Station, containing extracts from the East Indies Station's records and notes from the Senior Naval Officer in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (ff 16-38).

The Arabic language material consists of the aforementioned treaty text. The material written in French consists of small extracts from correspondence and treaty articles. It should be noted that there is no material covering the years 1924 and 1925.

The volume includes two dividers, which give a list of correspondence references contained in the volume by year. These are placed at the back of the correspondence (ff 4-5).

Extent and format
1 volume (649 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the volume.

The subject 4011 ( Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Negotiations) consists of two volumes, IOR/L/PS/10/1094-1095. The volumes are divided into two parts, with each part comprising one volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 651; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

Written in
English, French and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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File 4011/1923 Pt 1 'PERSIAN GULF NEGOTIATIONS 1928-33. BASIDU.' [‎34r] (72/1306), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/10/1094, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100077104051.0x000049> [accessed 18 November 2019]

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