Skip to item: of 475
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'File 5/193 II (B 38) Slavery in the Gulf' [‎92r] (188/475)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 volume (233 folios). It was created in 1 Jan 1930-18 Sep 1936. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

tuvlerstood th« eltuation thoroughlv* Incldentallyt both of
the* con epeafc a little Amble* They fully ragre d that it warn
quite Impossible for His Majesty’* Oovemraent to interfere in the
internal affairs of wild tribes like those in the Hodramsut •
They suggested however that in places like Bahrein, British
influence was strong* Their argument was (1) that the
Lesgue of Hotlons had a right to be informed, not only of
the terms of the slave trade treaties, but also of the
practical effect that may, or may not, be given to them;
and (3) that, as an act of courtesy. His Majesty’s Government
might supply Information regarding ’’domestic slavery* in
the area extending from Aden to Kowelt* It was Impossible not
to agree to so reasonable a request, and we were able
upon a formula which covered these points in moderate terms.
The paragraphs upon the subject came before the
Committee for approval on the 9th April* I was able then to
Ait in the copies of the treaties nu >plied to me by I r*
Laithwalte in respect of areas in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and the
maps of the Hadramaut, supplied to me by Mr* Blaster, with
copies of the treaties with some of the Sheikha* I was
careful to point out that these treaties did not include
all the Sheikhdoms. This fact however attracted no attention.
Monsieur Oohr, our chairmnn, had returned to Brussels, and
General Marchsnd wso in the chair* The paragraphs were
approved without comment*
The paragraphs were «e follows:-
"Paragraph 39 of the 1932 report of the Committee of Aperts
"mentions the Treaties - concluded with a view to preventing
"the slave trade - between the United Kingdom Government end
"the Sultans and Sheikhs of Muscat, the Trucial Oman and the
^Bahrein Archipelago, »nd certain Sheikas of the Aden
* Pro t ec t o ra t e/

About this item

Content

The majority of the correspondence in the volume relates to Sir George Maxwell's report on slavery in Arabia, submitted to the League of Nations Advisory Committee of Experts on Slavery in around 1936. The file should be read in conjunction with IOR/R/15/1/227, which contains a continuation of correspondence on the subject.

British officials in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. liaised with their colleagues at the Foreign and India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , to produce reports for Maxwell and the League of Nations Advisory Committee of Experts on Slavery. In January 1936 Maxwell sent questionnaires for completion to British representatives in the Gulf (folio 144). The questionnaire covered information such as size and population of states, and numbers, ethnicity and religion of slaves. Completed copies of the questionnaire from the Political Agents in Kuwait (folios 151, 160) Muscat (folio 153) and Bahrain and the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. (folios 155-58) are included. A letter from Maxwell to Mr Walton at the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. (folios 200-218), written July 1936, describes the political dimensions of the Slavery Committee talks, and the outcome of Maxwell's discussion with Lieutenant-Colonel Percy Loch, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. Bahrain, about the status of slavery in Bahrain. Included with the letter are two enclosures written by Maxwell, the first regarding Islamic law in relation to slavery, the second on domestic slavery in the Arab region.

Further correspondence in the volume, related to Maxwell's requests for information, takes place between officials from the Foreign Office, and British officials in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region. A telegram from a Foreign Office official in London, to the British Legation at Jiddah [Jeddah] in January 1935, discussed the political implications of the League of Nations/Maxwell's investigations regarding Saudi Arabia, while Britain's own negotiations with Ibn Saud [‘Abd al-‘Azīz bin ‘Abd al-Raḥmān bin Fayṣal Āl Sa‘ūd] were ongoing (folios 78-79). A letter sent from the Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. to the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. in September 1936 (folio 20-31), pointed out inaccuracies made by Maxwell about slavery in the Gulf, in his letter of July 1936.

Also of note in the file is a letter sent from the Bahrain Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. (Loch) to the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. (Lieutenant-Colonel Trenchard Fowle) in January 1936, discussing the impact of the global economic depression upon the pearling industry in Bahrain. Loch stated that 'slaves do not ... mind much where they go, so long as they have an owner who feeds and clothes them' and that born slaves 'are anxious to remain as slaves' (folios 130-31). Loch also recalled an anecdote for Fowle, of an old man who produced his manumission certificate to a medical officer. The man got angry when told by the officer that the certificate gave him his freedom, and not as the man insisted, that it proved he was a slave and was entitled to be fed by his owner.

Extent and format
1 volume (233 folios)
Arrangement

Correspondence in the volume has been arranged in chronological order, from earliest at the front of the volume, to latest at the rear. Office notes at the end of the volume (ff 219-227) repeat this chronological ordering.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 235; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. An additional foliation sequence is present in parallel; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled. A previous foliation sequence, which is also circled, has been superseded and therefore crossed out.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'File 5/193 II (B 38) Slavery in the Gulf' [‎92r] (188/475), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/226, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100080680658.0x0000bd> [accessed 18 February 2020]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100080680658.0x0000bd">'File 5/193 II (B 38) Slavery in the Gulf' [&lrm;92r] (188/475)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100080680658.0x0000bd">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0000c7/IOR_R_15_1_226_0188.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0000c7/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image