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'PRINCIPAL DESPATCHES AND CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO PERSIA CONNECTED WITH THE SUMMARY OF EVENTS AND MEASURES OF VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDDLESTON IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. JANUARY 1899 TO NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV-PART IV. PERSIA.' [‎24r] (52/136)

The record is made up of 1 volume (64 folios). It was created in 1908. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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relieved of tlie representation of Russian interests in April of the present
year. It was then announced that a Russian, named Ziedler, had been
appointed Russian Consul in Seistan—an announcement which was imme
diately followed by the despatch of Captain Sykes, hitherto British Consul at
Kerman, to Seistan in a similar capacity. The Russian Consul would appear
not yet to have taken up his post; and the Russian authorities are believed
to he waiting to see the next move of Her Majesty’s Government before deciding
upon their own action.
33. Meanwhile in 1898, M. Zaroudny re-appeared upon the scene of his
former labours, and on the present occasion pushed his politico-scientific
studies as far south as Persian Baluchistan and Bampur. Early in the present
year the Agent to the Governor-General at Meshed reported that two Russian
officers, 1 doctor and 10 Cossacks were still at Turhat-i-Haidari, and
1 Russian Officer, 2 Medical Assistants and 10 Cossacks at Karez. There are
also 58 Persian sowars scattered about at different places between Meshed and
Seistan, who are paid through the Russian officers and take their orders from
them. The recrudescence of plague in India has in fact provided an excuse for
the continuance, just as its original appearance was pleaded in support of the in
troduction, of a Russian Protectorate in Southern Khorasan. A more
active assertion of the same pretensions has since been witnessed in the mission of
M. Stroeff, Dragoman to the Russian Consulate at Meshed, with presents valued
at £1,400, to the Persian Governor of Kain, who is brother to the Governor of
Seistan and is believed to covet the succession to that post. The sanitary plea
was also advanced in the course of the past summer to explain the despatch of
Russian doctors to Kerman and even to Shiraz. An interesting commentary
upon these proceedings may be found in an observation in Lieutenant Webb
Ware’s report upon the Quetta-Seistan trade route for 1897-98, where he says
that “ the chief hindrance to the further development of this route is to be found
in the obstructive measures taken by the Russian officers striving to further the
interests of that country at the expense of India”.
34. The facts which we have enumerated will, we think, be sufficient
to convince Your Lordship of two propositions: firstly, that Russia regards
with unconcealed aversion the opening of the British commercial route from
India to Seistan and Khorasan, and will spare no efforts to rob it of success;
secondly, that she regards with an interested eye the future of Seistan itself,
and is already preparing, by a display of armed force and by the assumption of
executive authority, to pave the way for an eventual inclusion within the
Russian sphere of that portion of the Shah’s dominions.
35. In the same context, and as illustrating the political and strategical
object which such an advance may be believed to have in view, it will not
be forgotten that during the past few years, the Russian Government have
constructed a railway from Merv to Kushk upon the Afghan frontier within
80 miles of Herat, and have stacked at the terminus the railway plant for a
future extension to Herat itself. Should any doubt be entertained as to the
purpose for which this extension (which is destitute of any commercial justifi
cation) was planned, it may be solved by a reference to the frank admission
made to Sir N. O’Conor by M. deWitte, Russian Minister of Einance, in June
1898, that it was designed “ to enable Russia to attack Afghanistan in case of
complications with England When it is remembered that such an attack
can only be made in direct violation of solemn international engagements, it is
not, we think, incumbent upon us to argue at further length that the political
ambitions of Russia in Eastern Persia, and in close proximity to the Afghan
border, have an ulterior significance which it would be folly to ignore.
36. Nor can we divorce these proceedings from the idea that, in seeking
to obtain a preferential footing in Seistan, Russia is not merely endeavouring
to block a promising avenue of Anglo-Indian trade, and to acquire a position
of potential menace to British interests on the western flank of Afghanistan,
but that she is also concerned in the prosecution of an advance, which is not
expected to terminate until it has brought her to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . It is known

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Content

Published by Superintendent Government Printing, India, Calcutta.

The volume consists of a draft Part IV to the Summary of the Principal Events and Measures of the Viceroyalty of His Excellency Lord Curzon of Keddleston, Viceroy and Governor-General of India in the Foreign Department. I. January 1899-April 1904. II. December 1904-November 1905. Volume IV. Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Parts I-III), published by GC [Government Central] Press, Simla, 1907 [Mss Eur F111/531-534].

The volume includes a letter from the Foreign Department, Government of India, to Lord Curzon, dated 27 August 1908, stating that an examination of their records had shown that these were the essential despatches, and hoping that the volume would answer Lord Curzon's purpose.

The despatches and correspondence cover the period 1899-1905, and include correspondence from the Secretary of State for India, and HBM's Minister at Tehran, and cover the question of the appointment of an additional consular officer in Persia, 1899 (with map); relations between Britain and Persia; the protection of British interests in Persia; British policy on Persia; the political and financial situation in Persia; and the threat of Russian encroachment.

Extent and format
1 volume (64 folios)
Arrangement

The despatches and correspondence are arranged in chronological order from the front to the rear of the volume. There is a list of contents on folio 6, giving details of name and date of paper, subject, and page number.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 66; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the volume also contains an original manuscript pagination sequence.

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'PRINCIPAL DESPATCHES AND CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO PERSIA CONNECTED WITH THE SUMMARY OF EVENTS AND MEASURES OF VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDDLESTON IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. JANUARY 1899 TO NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV-PART IV. PERSIA.' [‎24r] (52/136), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/535, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100083163671.0x000035> [accessed 21 August 2019]

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