Skip to item: of 220
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

Miscellaneous correspondence, reports, maps and other papers concerning the Middle East [‎76v] (153/220)

The record is made up of 1 file (110 folios). It was created in 27 Aug 1893-19 Dec 1918. It was written in English and French. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

%
14
(2) that the leading- Shaikhs of the tribe should come in and make formal
submission to Ibn Sand, who undertook to pardon their past offences on con
dition of their settling- peacefully in such locality as he might appoint; or
(3) that, in the event of their declining both of the above alternatives,
they must remove themselves forthwith from any British or Kuwait territory,
in which they might be, thereafter to be treated as enemies wherever found.
This arrangement I communicated in my telegram Xo. M-4, dated the
2nd December, 1917, informing Sir P. Cox at the same time that, subject to
his approval, Colonel Hamilton, on his return to Kuwait, would announce the
terms imposed on it to the tribe.
I am not quite clear as to the subsequent course of Colonel Hamilton’s
dealings with the tribal leaders, but from a note on the tribe written in Sep
tember, 1918, by Captain P. G. Loch, then Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Kuwait, it is
clear that his negotiations broke down and that another attempt to find a
solution of the difficulty was made in February, 1918, when an agreement was
signed by Colonel Hamilton, Shaikh Salim and Dhaidan ibn Hitlain, the
leading (hitherto proscribed) Ajman chief already referred to, whereby the
tribe was given an asylum in the neighbourhood of Zubair on the following
•conditions, namely: —
(1) That the whole bribe should take up its residence within the Occupied
Territories, i.e., at Zubair or elsewhere as appointed; and
(2) that the tribe should on no account re-enter the limits of Kuwait ter
ritory. Moreover, though it was not expressly so stipulated in the agree
ment ; it was clear that an obligation to refrain from all molestation of Ibn
Sand’s territory or tribes was imposed upon the Ajman by these terms—indeed
they could not raid into Najd without passing through Kuwait territory and
thus transgressing the second of the ahovementioned conditions.
Thus once more the British Government entered into a pact with the
Ajman tribe and from the beginning the arrangements seemed foredoomed
to failure.
In the first place, after the signature of the agreement, the Ajman shewed
themselves to be in no hurry to comply with the condition of taking up their
residence at Zubair, and Shaikh Salim made no heroic efforts to enforce or
hasten their departure from Kuwait territory; Ibn Saud made constant com
plaints regarding their continued presence in Kuwait and I made corresponding
representations to the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. .
In due course some show of evacuation of Kuwait territory was made by
the tribe, which, however, had no sooner taken up its residence in its new
quarters near Zubair, than it proceeded to make Kuwait territory a leaping-olf
.ground for a series of raids into Najd, which took place at frequent intervals
throughout the summer months. The first raids were against the Subai
encampments in Hasa, the Mutair camps were also visited and, towards the
end of the period under report, the raiders began to go as far afield as Hafar
al Atsh, Mubayidh and other places not far distant from Ibn Saud’s own
capital.
It is unnecessary to deal in detail with these raids which met with but a
modicum of substantial success and in due course provoked counter-raids by
the Mutair, Subai and other elements until, towards the end of the period
under report, the whole of the Summan area was in a ferment of unrest,
through which I passed on my return to the coast, when I had a good oppor-
(unity of contrasting the security obtaining almost everywhere in Ibn Sand’s
own territories with the danger and excitement prevalent on the borderlands
oi Kuwait jurisdiction.
During the whole of these months Ibn Saud, who, by his agreement with
us, was debarred from taking steps to deal with the Ajman nuisance while
I was pressing him to disregard all minor matters in favour of the vigorous
prosecution of the offensive against Hail, maintained an attitude of constant
nnd not altogether unjustified querulousness, on which I reported with faithful
regularity but without success. U1
It was clear that the Deputy Civil Commissioner at Basrah, who was
ultimately responsible for the enforcement of the solemn pact of the Ajman
was neither disposed to treat the matter (which he regarded as part of the
regulai game of tribal raid and counter-raid), seriously nor in a position to
enforce such parts of the agreement as proved distasteful to the Ajman In
these circumstances matters rapidly reached an impasse, for which there
■seemed to be no reasonable solution.
%
_ j ^leanwhile Ibn Saud was preparing to open his offensive against Hail
, .•u IU i eSS r! t ' at host ^ es Liken from the Ajman to prevent anv
possi ile hostile movement on their part, but even this proved impracticable and
bvt^e \iman r ofT 1Sed v? T ld be done ^ enforcethe observance
was decideT: conditions ^Posed on them. In these circumstances it

About this item

Content

The file contains correspondence, memoranda, maps, and other papers relating to Middle Eastern affairs and a few other miscellaneous matters. The majority of the file concerns discussions of and proposals for the post-war settlement of Near Eastern territories, including Turkey, Armenia, Georgia, Syria, Palestine, Iraq, and the Arabian Peninsula. The basis of these discussions was the Sykes-Picot agreement of 1916.

Other matters covered by the papers include events in Siam [Thailand] and Burmah [Myanmar] and the colonial rivalry in the region between France and Britain, the Baghdad Railway, and relations with Ibn Saud in Arabia, including a report on the 1917-18 mission to Najd by Harry St John Philby (folios 67-98).

Folios 99-110 are six maps with accompanying notes that show the various proposed territorial settlements and spheres of influence in the Near East and one showing Britain's global colonial possessions.

Memoranda and correspondence comes from officials at the Foreign Office and India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. . Other correspondents include French and Italian government officials.

Extent and format
1 file (110 folios)
Arrangement

The file is arranged in roughly chronological order, from the front to the back.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the front of the envelope with 1, and terminates at the inside back last page with 110, these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English and French in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

Miscellaneous correspondence, reports, maps and other papers concerning the Middle East [‎76v] (153/220), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F112/276, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100084619407.0x000099> [accessed 1 March 2024]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100084619407.0x000099">Miscellaneous correspondence, reports, maps and other papers concerning the Middle East [&lrm;76v] (153/220)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100084619407.0x000099">
	<img src="https://iiif.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000001491.0x00028a/Mss Eur F112_276_0155.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000001491.0x00028a/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image