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'Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency for the Years 1915-1919' [‎23v] (53/396)

The record is made up of 1 volume (194 folios). It was created in 1916-1920. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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36
PERSIAN GTILF ADMINISTRATION REPORT
With the victory at Shaiba, on the 14th of April, the situation became
less acute. The Turko-Arab force retreated to the Karkeh and the Bawis sub
mitted. The subsequent arrival of a Division at Ahwaz and the punishment of
the Beni Turuf had a sufficiently quieting influence to allow ot the repair of
the pipe line being taken in hand in May.
At the beginning of June, the head-quarters of the Vice-Consulate was
transferred from Mohammerah to Ahwaz.
During the summer months, several raids by the Arabs ^ of the Mian Ab
were made on the pipe line. The Chaab of i araiyeh-i-Paisal and Haider-i-
Talayil were chiefly suspected. A very bold raid in August on a camp at the
top of the Tull Kha Yat resulted in the loss of some 20 mules and ether gear
and led to the occupation of Band-i-Qir by two Squadrons of the 23rd Cavalry
from Ahwaz. This step had the desired effect as no mOie raids took place
during the year.
The punishment of the Beni Turuf had a very good effect on the Arabs of
the Mian Ab. During the winter 1915-i6, His Britannic Majesty's Vice
-consul was enabled to visit every Shaikh and tribe of any importance between
Ahwaz and Dizful, which had never been possible in previous years.
Owing to the removal of the head-quarters from Ahwaz to Mohammerah,
no summer tour being undertaken by His
Bakhtiari Affairs. Britannic Majesty's Vice-Consul and,
finally, the transference of Bakhtiari affairs in the month of July to His Britan
nic Majesty's Consul-General, Ispahan, the connection of the Ahwaz Vice-
Consul with Bakhtiaristan was to a great extent severed.
Sirdar-i-Jang, the Illkhani, and Sirdar Bahadur, acting Illbegi, remained
in the low country till late in May. The former's behaviour gave early cause
for anxiety. Although not openly hostile, he was nevertheless strongly biassed
against the allied cause, partly owing to his long-standing enemity with our
Ally the Shaikh of Mohammerah but chiefly owing to his fanatical interpretation
of his duty to Islam. During the months of Eebruary and March, he made
great efforts, in conjunction with Shaikh Murteza of Shushter, to spread the
jehad movement among the Arabs, he refused our request that he should stop
Wassmuss and his party from going to Eamuz and Behbehan, and he would not
agree to sending Bakhtiari sowars to protect the pipe line in Northern Arabistan.
Later in the year, documentary evidence came to hand which clearly showed
that Jang had actively incited the Arabs to join the A^ movement of the
early spring.
The Tllkhani and Illbegi met the Chief Political Officer in the latter half
of May at Darreh-i-Khazineh. The object of the meeting was to obtain an
undertaking from the Khans that they would remain neutral, no matter what
the attitude of their Government should be. It seemed at first as if the Khans
might acquiesce to our terms but, after some vaccillation, they took refuge
behind the plea, that they could not pledge the tribe without the knowledge and
consent of their brother Khans. Einally, however, a compromise was reached
in an agreement to guarantee the safety and lives of the British community at
the fields, and to afford 20 days' notice in case the Khans were unable to con
tinue to protect our settlement at Musjid-i-Suleiman.
After leaving Darreh Khazineh, the Khans met Haji Rais at Eamuz but
without any satisfactory results from the point of view of either the Shaikh or
ourselves. Eamuz continued as a recognised asylum for the Shaikh's disloyal
subjects, who, issuing forth from the shelter afforded them, raided the Shaikh's
loyal tribes.
Not long after the Khans arrived at Ispahan, in June, a strong movement
against Jang sprang up which finally resulted in his having to relinquish the
Illkhaniship. Jang had made many enemies who were not slow to turn on
him, when they realised that he had forfeited our good offices.
Sirdar-i-Muhtasham was chosen as Illkhani and he received our support.
The question of the lllbegiship was a more difficult one. The two chief candi
dates we^e Amir Jang and Amir Mujahid. The latter, in spite of his reputa
tion—he had been characterised in a Tehran telegram as a "liar and a

About this item

Content

The volume includes Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1915 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1916); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1916 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1917); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1917 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1919); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1918 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1920); and Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1919 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1920). The 1915 and 1919 Reports bear manuscript corrections written in pencil.

The Administration Reports contain separate reports, arranged in chapters, on each of the principal Agencies, Consulates, and Vice-Consulates that made up the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , and provide a wide variety of information, including details of senior British administrative personnel and local officials; descriptions of the various areas and their inhabitants; political, judicial and economic matters; notable events; medical reports; details of climate; communications; the movements of Royal Navy ships; military matters; the slave trade; and arms traffic.

Extent and format
1 volume (194 folios)
Arrangement

The reports are bound in chronological order from the front to the rear of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation system in use commences at 1 on the first folio after the front cover, and continues through to 194 on the last folio before the back cover. The sequence is written in pencil, enclosed in a circle, and appears in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. The following folio needs to be folded out to be read: f. 36.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency for the Years 1915-1919' [‎23v] (53/396), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/712, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023191503.0x000036> [accessed 23 May 2019]

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