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'Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency for the Years 1915-1919' [‎96r] (198/396)

The record is made up of 1 volume (194 folios). It was created in 1916-1920. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

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POR THE YEAR 1917
a Tiolent campaign was conducted against him in the Tehran papers. These
deTelopments frightened him so much that he sent in his resignation and had
to be dissuaded by His Majesty's Vice-Consul and assured of British support.
Since then his attitude has been marked by indecision and vacillation, but has
been more amenable. His position between the devil and the deep sea is
certainly not a comfortable one.
The Department of J ustice (Adliya) was administered throughout the
other Kemau officials. year by llaji Jalal -ul -Mamalik, a venal
and incompetent person with the outward
appearance of a publican, but consistently friendly to the Consulate
Majd-fMslam arrived in January to take up the post of Superintendent of
Education, but his appointment was strongly opposed by enemies in Kerman
and he was not finally appointed till April! In November, however, the
Tehran Democrats, who look upon the Education Department as their special
preserve, succeeded in replacing Majid-ul-Islam by Agba Yahya agairst the
wishes of His Majesty's Consulate. The new Rais-i-Mu'arif is^a noted Demo
crat who was one of the members of the Majlis returned for Kerman at the
last election.
The headship of the local Military Department was held by Sardar Nusrat
and of the Eoad Guards (Qarasaran) by his brother Adl-us-Sultan, until the
end of the year when, as described above, the Prince Governor removed them
both in. pursuance of his private feud. They were replaced by the Prince's
music-master and by a nonentity called Zahir-ul-Huzur respectively.
The Municipality (Baladiya) and the Police were both administered by
Prince's men," the incumbent in the latter case, iVasir Mizam, being an
ex-farrash boshi of the Governor-General's household. Both proved them
selves convenient channels for the flow of cash into the pockets of the Prince
and his Secretary, but apart from that their departments do not appear to
have been more than usually mismanaged.
The Deputy Governorship of Sirj an was held throughout the year by
The Districts. Mirza Mahmud Khan, who has given
complete satisfaction to the British
military authorities at Saidabad and may be regarded as a valuable ally. He
was particularly useful in connection with the operations against Hussain
Khan and the ^-prisoners, and with the march of the Shiraz reinforce
ments through his district in the early spring. Owing chiefly to Mirza
Mahmud Khan's failure to pay regularly 200—300 Tomans monthly douceur
demanded by the Governor-General, he was several times during the year in
danger of being removed from his post on one pretext or another. On each
occasion however His Majesty's Consul intervened successfully on his behalf.
&haukat-us-Sultaii and other Saidabad notables are also actively friendly.
Bam and Narmashir have been ruled during the year by Sardar Mujallal,
a son-in-law of Sardar Nusrat, though during most of the time he resided in
Kerman and administered the district by proxy. Sardar Mujallal is a pleasant
and well-disposed man of no very marked ability, but energetic and genuinely
anxious to keep his district in order. He has frequently been actively helpful
to His Majesty's Consulate and the South Persia Bifles.
The Aqta Afshar was held by Muhtashiimud-Dowleh, uncle of Sardar
Nusrat, until June, when he was removed for oppression with the concurrence
of His Majesty's Consul. His final downfall was caused by a * bast' taken
against him at the Baft Telegraph Office by the people of Deh Sard, who
alleged that he illegally extracted Tomans 1 5 300 from them. His place w r as
taken by Asaf-ul-Mulk, then Eevenue Agent at Baft. Like the Deputy
Oovernor of Sirjan, Asaf-ul-Mulk has been in constant correspondence with
His Majesty's Consulate since his appointment, and relies largely upon British
support. During the summer when the Daulatabad-Baft road from Bandar
Abbas was in constant use by military caravans, telegraph construction parties,
etc., Asaf-ul-Mulk worked hard to keep them supplied, a matter of consider
able difficulty owing to the drought and the destruction of the previous season's
crops by locusts.

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Content

The volume includes Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1915 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1916); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1916 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1917); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1917 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1919); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1918 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1920); and Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1919 (Delhi: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1920). The 1915 and 1919 Reports bear manuscript corrections written in pencil.

The Administration Reports contain separate reports, arranged in chapters, on each of the principal Agencies, Consulates, and Vice-Consulates that made up the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , and provide a wide variety of information, including details of senior British administrative personnel and local officials; descriptions of the various areas and their inhabitants; political, judicial and economic matters; notable events; medical reports; details of climate; communications; the movements of Royal Navy ships; military matters; the slave trade; and arms traffic.

Extent and format
1 volume (194 folios)
Arrangement

The reports are bound in chronological order from the front to the rear of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation system in use commences at 1 on the first folio after the front cover, and continues through to 194 on the last folio before the back cover. The sequence is written in pencil, enclosed in a circle, and appears in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. The following folio needs to be folded out to be read: f. 36.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency for the Years 1915-1919' [‎96r] (198/396), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/712, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023191503.0x0000c7> [accessed 24 May 2019]

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