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'Administration Reports 1905-1910' [‎201r] (406/616)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (304 folios). It was created in 1907-1911. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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AND THE MASKAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOR THE YEAR 1908.
93
in Sheikh Sultan's charge, and then, as the latter refused to be responsible
for him any longer and it was proved to the majlis that Nasir had concealed
some of the pearls which he had taken out of Bahrain, he was taken into
custody in the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. on the 13th July until the settlement of the case, which
was effected on the 10th August when the creditors of the insolvent signed an
agreement which was ratified by the majlis. Under the terms of this agree
ment all the creditors dropped half their claims, the mortgagee creditors
were to realize^as much as they could with the knowledge and approval of the
majlis from the pearls in their custody and the value of the un-mortgaged
pearls was to be divided up rateably as expeditiously as possible. The debtor
was to satisfy his Katar creditors out of his miscellaneous property, live
stock, boats, etc., and any balance due to the Bahrain creditors after the divi
sion of the pearl-money was to be liquidated in three annual instalments.
The amount of this balance has now proved to be R33,096-10-4, and it remains
to be seen whether Nasir bin Shahin will ever be in a position to fulfil his
undertaking.
In Wakra a recrudescence of the trouble, reported last year to have
occurred between Sheikh Abdur Rahaman bin Jasim, the Governor, and the
Al-bu-Ainain section of that town, has unfortunately been witnessed in con
sequence of the tribesmen's reiterated objection to paying the annual boat-
tax. For this the Sheikh fined the tribe 10,000 rials and demanded the
expulsion of six of the headmen from the town. The Al-bu-Ainain then
appealed to the Turkish authorities in Basrah for protection, sending as their
envoy a fellow-tribesman named Ahmad bin Khatar, who is resident in
Bahrain, with the request that a military garrison might'be established in
Wakra. The envoy returned in due course from Basrah with two letters
addressed to Sheikh Jasim bin Thani " Kaimmakam of Katar" and the
Turkish Commander of the Doha garrison, which seem to have had the effect
of reconciling the two conflicting parties in Wakra, neither of whom was
really anxious to see a Turkish garrison in the town. A fortnight later,
when a new Mutasarrif of Hasa, Mahir Pasha, was passing through Bahrain,
three members of the Al-bu-Ainain tribe from Wakra called upon him and
informed him of the amicable settlement of their trouble.
The whole incident is an unfortunate one so far as it has given the Basrah
officials an opening for reasserting their authority over the Katar peninsula,
though the claim has been vigorously repudiated by Mr. Crow, His Majesty s
Consul in Basrah, and for perhaps assuming to themselves with some reason
the credit of having settled the present difficulty. The Turks, however, are
now beginning, to show a very decided tendency to assert their authority
over the independent towns-people and tribesmen of Hasa, and it is reason
able to conclude that if they obtain any success in this direction, they will not
fail to establish themselves more strongly in Katar with a view to obtaining
some revenue from the district, unless they are checked definitely by His
Majesty's Government. The Katar political problem is therefore one which
is almost certain now to call for early and serious consideration.
The state of the two oases during the hot weather of 1908 was still more Hasa, Katif
disturbed than at any period of the previous twelve months, indeedandthe^
possibly than at any time since the conquest of the districts by the Turks m tribal
1871. The vague news regarding the coup d'etat in Constantinople may ern orlea,
have had something to do with this, but the intrigues of Abdul Aziz bin
Saud and his representative residing in Hasa, Abdul Aziz bin Masnuq,
very probably were the more immediate cause. The Mutasarnt at
the commencement of the year, Rashid Pasha, was evidently a weak man w o
appealed even to Bin Mashuq for assistance in the detection and punishment
of crimes committed by the turbulent towns-people of Mubarraz and else
where. Rashid Pasha left Hasa in July; he was succeeded for a tew days
by Taufiq Beg, and then came Ahmad Mumtaz Beg who also left tor Basran
in October. The Mutasarrif in office at the close of the year Mahir i^asna.
seems to be a different stamp of man, one of his first acts haying been o
warn Bin Mashuq either to quit Hasa or to abstain from interfering m public
affairs, and another to apply for strong reinforcements of troops trom ±}asran.
/
in

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Content

The volume contains Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for 1905-1906 (Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India, 1907); Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1906-1907 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1908); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and the Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1907-1908 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1909); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and the Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for April-December1908 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1909); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year Ending 31st December 1909 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1911); and Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1910 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1911).

The Reports contain reviews by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. and chapters on each of the consulates, agencies, and other administrative regions that made up the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. . The Reports contain information on political developments, territorial divisions, local administration, principal tribes, British personnel and appointments, trade and commerce, naval and marine matters, communications, judicial matters, archaeology, pearl fisheries, the slave trade, arms and ammunition traffic, medical matters and public health, oil, notable visitors and events, meteorological data, and related topics.

Extent and format
1 volume (304 folios)
Arrangement

There is a list of contents at the front of each Report.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at 1 on the front cover and terminates at 306 on the back cover. These numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and can be found in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. The following folios need to be folded out to be read: ff. 40, 261.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Administration Reports 1905-1910' [‎201r] (406/616), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/710, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023487521.0x000007> [accessed 13 November 2018]

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