Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎32] (175/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

• >Vr-v'.;' ;■> /./ ;
Despatch of
an Knglish
embtssy to
Persia under
Sir D. Cotton.
Voyage of
the English
embassy to
India, 1627.
32
appeared habited as a PerBian and was received with much ceremony.
Meanwhile, however, perhaps at the suggestion of the Company's servants
in Persia, Shah 'Abbas had despatched a Persian gentleman as Ambas
sador to England; this was a certain Naqdi 'Ali Baig, who left Surat in
April 1625 but did not reach England until February 1626, sometime
after the a Star/' in which he sailed, had been given up for lost. A
singular collision occurred in London between the Shah's two ambas
sadors, of whom Naqdi 'Ali Baig apparently enjoyed the countenance of
the East India Company. Sir Robert Sherley, having gone with the
Earl of Cleveland and others to visit Naqdi 'Ali Baig at his lodgings,
was violently assaulted and knocked down by the Persian and his son;
and Naqdi 'Ali Baig declared Sherley to be an impostor and his letter of
credence a forgery. On the 6th of March 1626 the Persian had an
audience of King Charles and presented a letter from the Shah, in which
it was stated that Naqdi 'Ali Baig had been sent "to desire nothing but
" His Majesty's love, and that he would command his merchants and all
" his people to come freely into his country to buy or sell or do what they
" pleased, and none should dare to force any bargain upon them."
The Knglish court, though inclined to trust Sir Robert Sherley, were
unable to decide between the two disputants, and ultimately the King
decided to send Sir Dodmore Cotton as Ambassador to Persia to
reciprocate the friendly sentiments of the Shah, to place the English
trade in Persia, which as we have seen was in a depressed state, upon a
better footing, and also to ascertain whether Sir Robert Sherley had
really been accredited to him by the Shah. Sherley was to accompany
the mission, and the East India Company were requested to arrange for
the conveyance of the Ambassador and his party to Persia. This last
demand the Company sought to evade, as they wished neither Cotton
nor Sherley to be brought into their affairs, but their objections were
overruled. Cotton was instructed, however, not to interfere in the
Company's mercantile business.
The Company's fleet, carrying the English Ambassador, his staff,—in
cluding Sir Thomas Herbert, the chronicler of the mission,— and the
rival Persian Ambassadors, sailed from England on Good Friday 1627
and reached Surat on the 30th of November in the same year. On the
day of sighting the Indian coast, Naqdi 'Ali Baig, on whom the fear of
his master s displeasure had begun to weigh,* committed suicide by
» He lad torn up a commission which Sherley alleged to be the Shah'.s and he had
also been guilty of some irregularities in money n atters. Shfih 'Abbas subseqaentlj
^ec are ^ I 16 bad not thus prevented it, at his coning to tie Court his Body
should first have been hackt in pieces, and t! en in tie open Market -place burnt with
" Dogu-ttirda.'' r r

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎32] (175/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000b0> [accessed 22 May 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000b0">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;32] (175/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000b0">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0175.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image