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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎117] (260/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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117
of a Company s servant, which will be necessary if they send any Woollen
goods up there/ - ' The chief imports at this time seem to have been broad
cloth and perpets, and a merchant representing both the Shah and the
Governor of Mrs once arrived at Bandar "'Abbas and wished to buy large
quantities of these. As, however, he proposed to pay for them by means
of bills on the customs officer, the British Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. refused to supply him ;
but the Dutch did business with him on his own terms.
At the beginning of 1737 Mr. Savage, in charge of the Company^ 1737
affairs at Kirman, reported that some Georgians had arrived there
from Isfahan with cloth from a * Factory which had recently been
established at Astrakhan, and that, in view of this fact, not more
than 1,000 or 1,200 Tumans 3 worth of the Company's woollen goods
could be disposed oi by him during the coming season. An obstacle to
trade in Kirman was the depreciation of the Persian silver coinage, consist
ing of "'Abbasis and Mahmudis, in consequence of which the Agent and
Council at Bandar 'Abbas decided to send not more thau one-fifth of the
year's woollen goods to Kirman, aud to take payment for the same only iu
'Abbasis at five Shahis, or in coined copper, or in old copper. The other
four-fifths were disposed of through the broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. at Bandar 'Abbas, for
the sole alternative was to sell to the local governor, " who wou'd have
obliged them to take silver money at fifty per cent." A little later it
was reported that the broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. found difficulty in getting rid of the
broadcloth and perpets which he had taken; that communication with
Kirman had been interrupted by the impressment of the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. muleteers
to carry provisions to the camp of Nadir Shah, who was then besieging the
citadel of Qandahar; and that four or five foreign merchants had come to
Kirman to buy red wool for, it was supposed, the Aleppo market.
In 1740, notwithstanding the unsettled state of Persia, there was a
strong demand for English woollens; it appeared to be due to a
prohibition against the importation of woollens from Turkey. The
price of Kirman wool was however so high, in consequence of its being
taken to manufacture coats and caps for Nadir Shah's army, that Mr.
Savage was unable to purchase any at a reasonable price.
By the beginning of 1744 the British Factory at Isfahan, for a time 1744,
in abeyance, had been re-opened, and by this means the trade from Russia
into that part of Persia L id been altogether stopped. Encouraged by this
success the Agent and Council at Bandar 'Abbas were inclined to send
* This must apparently have been a Factory of the (British) Russia Company, with
whose operations on the Caspian and iu Northern Persia (chiefly in 1742-49) the natujs
of Elton and Hauway are associated.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎117] (260/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00003d> [accessed 14 November 2018]

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